MODERN ARCHITECTURE AND INTERNATIONAL PRESERVATION FEATURED AT BARTLESVILLE CONFERENCE

With Modern architecture and international preservation issues featured in Tradition and Transition: Oklahoma’s 27th Annual Statewide Preservation Conference (June 3-5, Bartlesville), a January 2015 announcement by the U. S. Department of the Interior came at the perfect time. DOI Secretary Jewell announced that the United States is nominating “Key Works of Modern Architecture” by Frank Lloyd Wright to the World Heritage List. The group consists of ten buildings from seven states, including Bartlesville’s Price tower. The UNESCO World Heritage Committee will consider the nomination in the summer of 2016. If approved by the committee, the thematic group will become the twenty-third United States WHL inscription.

On Wednesday, June 3, George C. Papagiannis, External Relations and Information, UNESCO, will highlight the work of the international organization and the importance of the WHL in UNESCO, the U.S. and World Heritage. George handles external relations for UNESCO in the United States, raising awareness and advocating for the organization, as well as providing a point of contact to the U.S. Government, civil society organizations and other interested parties working on issues of interest to UNESCO, including the protection of cultural and natural sites around the globe and the designation of World Heritage Sites (WHS).

 

Before assuming his assignment in the U.S. in the spring of 2012, he was the officer-in-charge of the UNESCO’s Iraq Office in Baghdad. Among his efforts, George emphasized the role of women in new media, supported initiatives to protect journalists and led two cultural assessment missions in Iraq, evaluating the Kirkuk Citadel and sites in the holy city of Najaf, which were under consideration for the Iraq World Heritage Tentative List. Prior to joining UNESCO in 2007, he had a distinguished journalism career.

Then, Valerie Hauser, Director, Office of Native American Affairs, Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, will discuss the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. She advises ACHP leadership on policy matters and historic preservation issues affecting Indian Tribes and Native Hawaiian organizations and provides technical expertise to federal agencies regarding tribal and Native Hawaiian consultation. Valerie also represents the ACHP on government-wide initiatives involving indigenous issues. Before joining the ACHP in 1989, she served as Director of Archeology at an environmental education center in New York City. She received her Master of Arts in Anthropology from New York University.


The closing plenary session (Friday, June 5) will feature Tim Samuelson, Cultural Historian, City of Chicago, Cultural Affairs & Special Events. Tim is an authority on the works of Frank Lloyd Wright and Bruce Goff, as well as other Modern style buildings. He will present “Thinking in Three Dimensions.”

Tim has been instrumental in celebrating and protecting Chicago’s past for more than twenty-five years. He is highly regarded for his stewardship of the cultural and architectural history of the city at the Commission on Chicago Landmarks and the Chicago Historical Society. But Tim’s work on behalf of Chicago’s cultural treasures does not stop at his office door. He volunteered his time to work on the restoration of such landmark structures as Union Station, Chess Records, and the Pilgrim Baptist Church. He led the fight to save historic Bronzeville in the 1970’s and pushed for its landmark designation. He continues to work with the Landmark Commission as an advocate for the preservation of buildings that represent diverse aspects of the city’s cultural history. He possesses a wealth of knowledge about Chicago’s neighborhoods the people, the stores, the factories, the labor history. He shares this history by presenting Chicago Neighborhood Tours and by organizing exhibitions that portray subjects relating to popular culture and architecture in an accessible way. As he says, the goal is to get people excited about history especially those who never imagined they would be.

Full conference program and registration information will be available in late April. Follow conference developments at http://www.okhistory.org/shpo/conference.htm and

http://www.facebook.com/okshpo; http://www.twitter.com/okshpo

If you may have questions, contact Melvena Heisch, Deputy SHPO (405/522-4484 or mheisch@okhistory.org).

SHPO’s HISTORIC CONTEXT FOR MODERN ARCHITECTURE IN OKLAHOMA

Take a good look around Oklahoma and you will see entire subdivisions and neighborhoods full of similar houses built between the mid-1940s and 1970s. These neighborhoods reflect the architectural styles and forms popular at the time, including minimal traditional, ranch, and split-levels to name a few. Following World War II, many of these houses were built in response to the housing shortage faced across the United States, not just in Oklahoma.

Today, the large numbers of “modern” houses and neighborhood developments present a challenge. These houses and neighborhoods have now reached, or are about to reach, their 50th birthday. This is when preservation professionals and their partners start to evaluate resources for eligibility for listing in the National Register of Historic Places. Yes Virginia, houses from the 1940’s through the 1970’s are now historic!

In anticipation of needed evaluation, the Oklahoma State Historic Preservation Office prepared the following document: Historic Context for Modern Architecture in Oklahoma.  SHPO staff members Lynda Ozan, architectural historian and Allison Archambo, survey coordinator spent two years researching and evaluating resources from the 1940s through the 1970s and developed a methodology for evaluating these resources.  The document establishes a historic context for Oklahoma for residential properties of the postwar era and outlines methodologies for survey and evaluating them for National Register of Historic Places eligibility.  The context is currently available at http://www.okhistory.org/shpo/thematics.htm  Allison and Lynda will discuss the Modern Architecture context at the annual Statewide Preservation Conference in Bartlesville and look forward to the discussion the document stimulates.

NTHP PRESIDENT SPEAKS AT PRESERVATION CONFERENCE

One of the nation’s leading preservationists, Stephanie K. Meeks, President of the National Trust for Historic Preservation will present  “The Future of the Past: Reconceiving Historic Preservation for the 21st Century” in the opening plenary session for Tradition and Transition: Oklahoma’s 27th Annual Statewide Preservation Conference. It will be held June 3-5 in Bartlesville.

MeeksMeeks has been the president and chief executive officer of the NTHP since July 2010. Under her leadership, the organization has developed an ambitious strategic plan designed to refocus direct action on saving imperiled places, engage new audiences in preservation, and increase the organization’s impact by a factor of ten. The NTHP is working to bring a more diverse and younger group of Americans into the preservation movement, and support their efforts in their communities and across the nation.  It has also launched an effort to highlight the critical connection between older buildings and vibrant cities, and spearheaded research reflecting the benefits of historic preservation in today’s urban areas.

Before joining the NTHP, Meeks held several senior executive positions with The Nature Conservancy; served as director of RARE, a U.S.-based conservation group that uses social marketing to address environmental challenges in communities around the world; and currently serves as Vice Chair of the Board of the Potomac Conservancy. She holds a B.A. in English from the University of Colorado and an MBA from George Washington University.

Full conference program and registration information will be available in late April. For more details, contact Melvena Heisch at 405/522-4484 or mheisch@okhistory.org, or visit the SHPO’s website at http://www.okhistory.org/shpo/conference.htm.

SCHOLARSHIPS TO ATTEND 2015 STATEWIDE PRESERVATION CONFERENCE NOW AVAILABLE

The Oklahoma Historical Society, State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) is pleased to announce the availability of scholarships for Oklahoma college and university students to attend Tradition and Transition:  Oklahoma’s 27th Annual Statewide Preservation Conference. It will be held June 3-5, 2015, in downtown Bartlesville (full registration and program details available in late April).

We are offering twenty (20) scholarships on a first-come basis to those who qualify.  The scholarship covers the conference registration fee, and the application deadline is 5:00pm, Friday, May 1. For details and an application form contact Melvena Heisch, Deputy SHPO, at 405/522-4484 or mheisch@okhistory.org, or visit the SHPO’s website at www.okhistory.org/shpo/conference.htm.

Brief conference overview:

Save the dates, June 3-5, 2015, for Tradition and Transition: Oklahoma’s 27th Annual Statewide Preservation Conference. The special places we appreciate, protect, and adapt for new uses embody our traditions. A more diverse preservation community develops; what is considered significant evolves; and new preservation methods and strategies emerge. The conference program will address these topics during two plenary sessions and three concurrent tracks of sessions.

Plenary session speakers include Stephanie K. Meeks, President, National Trust for Historic Preservation, Washington, D. C., and Tim Samuelson, Cultural Historian, City of Chicago, Cultural Affairs & Special Events, Chicago, Illinois.

The three concurrent tracks of sessions include:

TRACK A: Our Architectural Legacy – Featuring properties associated with the Phillips and other oil industry families; the designs of Frank Lloyd Wright; resources of the recent past; and the rehabilitation tax credits application process.

TRACK B: Preservation Challenges and Opportunities in the 21st Century – Spotlighting the work of the United Nations and its World Heritage List; the preservation work of tribal governments and Tribal Historic Preservation Offices in Oklahoma and the tribal programs of the National Park Service; Advisory Council on Historic Preservation; and other federal agencies.

TRACK C: Main Streets and Neighborhoods – Celebrating the Oklahoma Main Street Program’s 30th anniversary with a look back at its accomplishments and a look ahead to the challenges and opportunities for downtown redevelopment. Additionally, sessions focus on financial and other tools for revitalizing historic neighborhoods.

Special events include the opening reception; local tours; Preservation Oklahoma, Inc.’s annual meeting and luncheon; and the State Historic Preservation Office’s annual awards banquet.

Conference cosponsors include Oklahoma Historical Society, State Historic Preservation Office; Oklahoma Department of Commerce, Oklahoma Main Street Center; Preservation Oklahoma, Inc.; Downtown Bartlesville Inc.; Bartlesville Area History Museum; Bartlesville Chamber of Commerce; Bartlesville Visitors Bureau; Bartlesville Redevelopment Trust Authority; City of Bartlesville; Price Tower Arts Center; and Washington County Historical Society.

Full conference program and registration information will be available in late April.  Follow conference developments at

http://www.okhistory.org/shpo/conference.htm;

http://www.facebook.com/okshpo; http://www.twitter.com/okshpo;

2015 STATEWIDE PRESERVATION CONFERENCE IN BARTLESVILLE

Save the dates, June 3-5, 2015, for Tradition and Transition: Oklahoma’s 27th Annual Statewide Preservation Conference. The special places we appreciate, protect, and adapt for new uses embody our traditions. A more diverse preservation community develops; what is considered significant evolves; and new preservation methods and strategies emerge. The conference program will address these topics during two plenary sessions and three concurrent tracks of sessions.

The first plenary session occurs on Wednesday afternoon, June 3, and the featured speaker is Stephanie K. Meeks, President, National Trust for Historic Preservation, Washington, D. C. She will discuss the NTHP’s new initiatives and the benefits of preservation for all communities. Tim Samuelson, Cultural Historian, City of Chicago, Cultural Affairs & Special Events, Chicago, Illinois, addresses the second plenary session on Friday afternoon, June 5. He will present a lively discussion about the significance of modern architecture with a focus on the work of Frank Lloyd Wright and Bruce Goff.

The three concurrent tracks of sessions include:

TRACK A: Our Architectural Legacy – Featuring properties associated with the Phillips and other oil industry families, the designs of Frank Lloyd Wright, and resources of the recent past. Also, sessions highlight certified rehabilitations statewide and the Historic Preservation Certification Application process.

TRACK B: Preservation Challenges and Opportunities in the 21st Century – Spotlighting the work of the United Nations and its World Heritage List, the preservation work of tribal governments and Tribal Historic Preservation Offices in Oklahoma and the tribal programs of the National Park Service and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation. Also, other federal agencies will share information about their cultural resource management efforts.

TRACK C: Main Streets and Neighborhoods – Celebrating the Oklahoma Main Street Program’s 30th anniversary with a look back at its accomplishments and a look ahead to the challenges and opportunities for downtown redevelopment. Additionally, sessions focus on financial and other tools for revitalizing historic neighborhoods.

In addition to dozens of Oklahoma preservationists and the plenary speakers, special guest speakers include Antonio Aguilar, Technical Preservation Services Branch, National Park Service, Washington, D. C.; James Bird, Chief, Tribal Preservation Program, National Park Service, Washington, D. C.; Julie Fitzpatrick, Assistant Director/ Special Projects Coordinator, Pennsylvania Downtown Center, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania; Valerie Hauser, Director, Office of Native American Affairs, Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, Washington, D. C.; Susan Allen Kline, Independent Historic Preservation Consultant, Fort Worth, Texas; George C. Papagiannis, External Relations and Information, UNESCO, New York, New York; and Joe Watkins, Supervisory Anthropologist and Chief, Tribal Relations and American Cultures, National Park Service, U. S. Department of the Interior, Washington, D. C.

Special events include the opening reception; local tours; Preservation Oklahoma, Inc.’s annual meeting and luncheon; and the State Historic Preservation Office’s annual awards banquet.

Conference cosponsors include Oklahoma Historical Society, State Historic Preservation Office; Oklahoma Department of Commerce, Oklahoma Main Street Center; Preservation Oklahoma, Inc.; Downtown Bartlesville Inc.; Bartlesville Area History Museum; Bartlesville Chamber of Commerce; Bartlesville Visitors Bureau; Bartlesville Redevelopment Trust Authority; City of Bartlesville; Price Tower Arts Center; and Washington County Historical Society.

Full conference program and registration information will be available in late April.  Follow conference developments at

http://www.okhistory.org/shpo/conference.htm;

http://www.facebook.com/okshpo; http://www.twitter.com/okshpo;

If you may have questions, contact Melvena Heisch, Deputy SHPO (405/522-4484 or mheisch@okhistory.org) or Chris Wilson, Director, Downtown Bartlesville, Inc. at 918/214-8500 or cwilson@downtownbartlesvilleinc.org.