Meet the Speakers

The full program and registration information for Tradition and Transition: Oklahoma’s 27th Annual Statewide Preservation Conference will be mailed statewide the week of April 20th. The program features sixty speakers from Oklahoma and across the nation. To help you get to know them, we present the following biographical sketches.

 

Our special guest speakers include:

Antonio Aguilar
Technical Preservation Services Branch
National Park Service
U. S. Department of the Interior

Washington, DC

Antonio is a historical architect with the Technical Preservation Services, National Park Service. He has been with TPS since 2000 reviewing applications for the 20% Federal Tax Incentives Program. Currently, he reviews projects from the States of Arizona, California, Michigan, Oklahoma, South Carolina, and Utah. Before joining the National Park Service, his full-time commitment to historic preservation began at the Georgia State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) as a Rehabilitation Architect. He received a Bachelor of Science in Architecture and Master of Architecture degrees from the Georgia Institute of Technology.

 

James Bird

Chief
Tribal Preservation Program
National Park Service

  1. S. Department of the Interior

Washington, DC

James is the National Park Service Chief of the Tribal Preservation Program. His primary responsibility is the administration of the National Historic Preservation Act’s (NHPA) provisions for Tribal preservation. In Fiscal Year 2014, the NPS tribal program provided nearly $9 Million in Historic Preservation Fund (HPF) grants to the Nation’s Indian Tribes. James provides technical assistance to tribes in establishing Tribal Historic Preservation Office (THPO) programs, manages the NPS Tribal Grant program and consults with various tribes and federal agencies on historic preservation issues. He joined the NPS staff in 2004 after serving as the THPO for five years with his tribe, the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians. James is a Cultural Anthropologist and holds a Master’s Degree in Anthropology from the University of Oklahoma.

 

Julie Fitzpatrick

Assistant Director/ Special Projects Coordinator

Pennsylvania Downtown Center

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania

Since she has been with Pennsylvania Downtown Center, Julie has been involved with a variety of projects in communities all over the commonwealth. She facilitates community visioning, develops regional downtown revitalization strategies, establishes tourism infrastructure plans for heritage corridors, and develops business improvement district plans and other strategic planning activities. Currently, she is working with PA Department of Conservation and Natural Resources on a project focused on Nature-Based Placemaking. Julie has been with the Pennsylvania Downtown Center since 2005. She has a master’s degree in Community and Regional Planning and a Bachelor of Arts degree in Art History and Anthropology, all from Temple University. Her previous non-profit experience includes volunteering with arts organizations, local public TV and radio, the Historic Preservation Trust of Lancaster County, and the Susquehanna Waldorf School. She served on the board of the Susquehanna Sustainable Business Network (SSBN) for more than six years and is currently on the board for the Pennsylvania Urban & Community Forestry Council.

 

Valerie Hauser

Director
Office of Native American Affairs

Advisory Council on Historic Preservation

Washington, DC

Valerie is the Director of the Office of Native American Affairs for the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) in Washington, D.C. She advises ACHP leadership on policy matters and historic preservation issues affecting Indian Tribes and Native Hawaiian organizations and provides technical expertise to federal agencies regarding tribal and Native Hawaiian consultation. Valerie also represents the ACHP on government-wide initiatives involving indigenous issues. Before joining the ACHP in 1989, she served as Director of Archeology at an environmental education center in New York City. She received her Master of Arts in Anthropology from New York University.


Susan Allen Kline

Independent Historic Preservation Consultant

Fort Worth, Texas

Susan is a historian and preservation consultant in Fort Worth, Texas. She received an MA in History from Oklahoma State University. She previously was employed as the Architectural Historian/National Register Coordinator for the Oklahoma State Historic Preservation Office. She also worked as a contract historian for the National Historic Landmarks Survey in Washington, D.C. As a preservation consultant, Susan has prepared numerous National Register of Historic Places nominations and historic contexts for historic resources in Texas and Oklahoma. Her presentation at Oklahoma’s 2015 statewide preservation conference is based on the National Register nomination she prepared for the Joe J. and Lois Perkins House in Wichita Falls, Texas.

 

Stephanie K. Meeks
President

National Trust for Historic Preservation
Washington, DC

(Plenary Session #1 speaker, Oklahoma’s 27th Annual Statewide Preservation Conference, June 3)

Stephanie has been the president and chief executive officer of the National Trust for Historic Preservation since July 2010. Her opening plenary presentation is entitled The Future of the Past: Reconceiving Historic Preservation for the 21st Century. Under her leadership, the National Trust has developed an ambitious strategic plan designed to refocus direct action on saving imperiled places, engage new audiences in preservation, and increase the organization’s impact by a factor of ten. Under Stephanie’s tenure, the National Trust has worked to bring a more diverse and younger group of Americans into the preservation movement, and support their efforts in their communities and across the nation. It has also launched an effort to highlight the critical connection between older buildings and vibrant cities, and spearheaded research reflecting the benefits of historic preservation in today’s urban areas. Stephanie has championed 21st-century business processes and systems to better meet today’s preservation challenges. The organization has strategically repositioned its portfolio of 27 historic sites to achieve new levels of stewardship, implemented a bold plan to upgrade its technology infrastructure, and moved its operations to the historic Watergate building, creating a dynamic, state-of-the-art workplace to move preservation forward. Before joining the National Trust, Stephanie served in several senior executive positions with The Nature Conservancy, one of the world’s largest and most influential conservation organizations. She also served as director of RARE, a U.S.-based conservation group that uses social marketing to address environmental challenges in communities around the world, and currently serves as Vice Chair of the Board of the Potomac Conservancy. She holds a B.A. in English from the University of Colorado and an MBA from George Washington University.

 

George C. Papagiannis
External Relations and Information
UNESCO
New York, New York

George handles external relations for UNESCO in the United States, raising awareness and advocating for the organization, as well as providing a point of contact to the U.S. Government, civil society organizations and other interested parties working on issues of interest to UNESCO, including the protection of cultural and natural sites around the globe and the designation of World Heritage Sites. His work includes WHL inscription of Poverty Point in Louisiana in June of 2014 and the nomination of the Spanish Missions of San Antonio, Texas, which will be considered by the World Heritage Committee in June of 2015. Before assuming his assignment in the U.S., George was the officer-in-charge of the UNESCO Iraq Office in Baghdad, again a point of contact and coordination for the government and the people of Iraq. Among his efforts, he led two cultural assessment missions in Iraq: evaluating the Kirkuk Citadel and sites in the holy city of Najaf, which were under consideration for Iraq’s World Heritage Tentative List. He also worked to emphasize the role of women in new media and supported initiatives to protect journalists. George’s distinguished career in the news business spanned more than 20-years. He worked as a reporter, news manager and talk show host in the United States and as a foreign correspondent for CBS Radio and public radio’s Marketplace and The World. He also launched the first ever news-talk radio programs in Germany, Holland, Cambodia and Tibet.

 

Scott W. Perkins

Director of Preservation

Western Pennsylvania Conservancy

Mill Run, Pennsylvania

(Special guest speaker, SHPO’s awards banquet, June 4)

Scott joined Fallingwater (a program of the Western Pennsylvania Conservancy), Mill Run, Pennsylvania, as Director of Preservation in May 2013 where he oversees the preservation and conservation of the 1937 Frank Lloyd Wright designed house and its 1939 guest house addition, their art and design collections, and the site’s housekeeping and horticulture teams. Prior to joining Fallingwater’s staff, Perkins served as Curator of Collections and Exhibitions at Price Tower Arts Center in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, housed in Wright’s 1956 Price Tower, his only realized skyscraper design. Among Scott’s many publications is his book, Building Bartlesville,1945-2000 (2008) (University of Virginia Press), which explores the post-World War II architectural impact of Frank Lloyd Wright, Bruce Goff, and William Wesley Peters upon the community. He authored the National Historic Landmark nomination for Price tower and for nearly a decade, has worked on the UNESCO World Heritage Site nomination, Key Works of Modern Architecture by Frank Lloyd Wright, which includes Price Tower, recently submitted for consideration to UNESCO for an anticipated inscription in 2016.

 

Tim Samuelson

Cultural Historian

City of Chicago

Cultural Affairs & Special Events

Chicago, Illinois

(Plenary Session #2 speaker, Oklahoma’s 27th Annual Statewide Preservation Conference, June 5)

Tim is Cultural Historian for Cultural Affairs & Special Events, City of Chicago. He is an authority on the works of Frank Lloyd Wright and Bruce Goff, as well as other Modern style buildings. His closing plenary presentation is entitled Thinking in Three Dimensions. Tim’s goal is to get people excited about history especially those who never imagined they would be. He has been instrumental in celebrating and protecting Chicago’s past for more than twenty-five years. He is highly regarded for his stewardship of the cultural and architectural history of the city at the Commission on Chicago Landmarks and the Chicago Historical Society. But Tim’s work on behalf of Chicago’s cultural treasures does not stop at his office door. He volunteered his time to work on the restoration of such landmark structures as Union Station, Chess Records, and the Pilgrim Baptist Church. He led the fight to save historic Bronzeville in the 1970’s and pushed for its landmark designation. He continues to work with the Landmark Commission as an advocate for the preservation of buildings that represent diverse aspects of the city’s cultural history. He possesses a wealth of knowledge about Chicago’s neighborhoods the people, the stores, the factories, the labor history. He shares this history by presenting Chicago Neighborhood Tours and by organizing exhibitions that portray subjects relating to popular culture and architecture in an accessible way.

 

Joe Watkins

Supervisory Anthropologist and

Chief, Tribal Relations and American Cultures

National Park Service

  1. S. Department of the Interior

Washington, DC

Joe, a member of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, has been “doing” anthropology for more than forty-five years. Before becoming the Supervisory Anthropologist and the Chief of the Tribal Relations and American Cultures Program of the National Park Service in Washington, DC, in 2013, he was Director of the Native American Studies Program at the University of Oklahoma. He has been intensively involved in anthropology at the national level as a member of the Board of Directors of the Society for American Archaeology and the Plains Anthropological Society, as well as in numerous capacities within committee structures of international, national and regional anthropological organizations. He has published numerous articles on the ethical practice of anthropology and anthropology’s relationships with descendant communities and populations.

 

Oklahoma preservation leaders and professionals who will speak in Bartlesville include:

Scott K. Ambler

President

Ambler Architects

Bartlesville, Oklahoma

Scott is President of Ambler Architects, a lifelong resident of Bartlesville and a graduate of Oklahoma State University. Ambler Architects is the author of Bartlesville’s Downtown Master Plan and is responsible for returning the streets to the pedestrian in Downtown Bartlesville. They were ground-breakers in traffic calming, parking and instrumental in the development of TIF districts as a way to incentivize Downtown Redevelopment. Scott and his partners purchased and renovated three downtown retail/residential buildings with an occupancy rate approaching 100%. He is the architect of record for the renovation, rehabilitation or restoration of over 40 of Downtown Bartlesville’s historic and older buildings. He is responsible for the delivery of many of the community’s most prominent facilities, such as the Bartlesville Public Library, the renovated Inn at Price Tower and the renovation of the Doenges Stadium. Scott has served on the Metropolitan Area Planning Commission for eight years, past president of the Bartlesville Area Chamber of Commerce and is a graduate of Leadership Bartlesville, Class I and of Leadership Oklahoma, Class XI.

Allison Archambo

Historian/Survey Coordinator

State Historic Preservation Office

Oklahoma Historical Society

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Allison is the Historian/Survey Coordinator for the Oklahoma State Historic Preservation Office. She has a degree in Historic Preservation from Southeast Missouri State University. She has prepared multiple National Register Nominations and authored several preservation related articles. Her most recent work includes an on-going survey of McClain County, Oklahoma.

 

Linda Barnett

Oklahoma Main Street Center

Oklahoma Department of Commerce

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

(Bio not yet available.)

 

Susie Clinard

Shawnee, Oklahoma

Following two years as the Program Manager for the Georgetown, Texas, Main Street Program, Susie established and directed the Oklahoma Main Street Program from 1985-1996.  During this time she worked with 31 towns across Oklahoma, expanding the original program to include the Small Towns Program and the Urban Main Street Program. She then took a position with the Savannah College of Art and Design. While in Georgia, Susie continued her involvement with historic preservation as the President of the Historic Savannah Foundation and the Ossabaw Island Foundation. Since returning to Oklahoma, she resumed her work in community revitalization efforts. Currently she serves on the board of Preservation Oklahoma, Inc., the Planning Commission for the City of Shawnee and the Chamber of Commerce DT Task Force.

 

Amanda DeCort

Executive Director

Tulsa Foundation for Architecture

Tulsa, Oklahoma

Amanda is the Executive Director of Tulsa Foundation for Architecture, a nonprofit organization committed to enriching Tulsa through the art of architecture and the power of design. TFA brings architecture to life through events such as the popular Second Saturday and Dwell in the IDL tours, as well as its extensive collection of original architectural drawings of significant Tulsa buildings. Prior to TFA, Amanda spent ten years as the City of Tulsa’s historic preservation planner, where she proposed nominations to the National Register of Historic places for numerous buildings and districts, provided staff support to the Tulsa Preservation Commission, and brought popular programs like hands-on window restoration boot camp and realtors’ continuing education classes to Tulsa. Her favorite project remains the Downtown Tulsa Survey project, which resulted in six historic districts and numerous Historic Tax Credit certified rehabilitation projects in downtown Tulsa. Amanda earned a Master’s Degree in Community Planning with a certificate in Historic Preservation from the University of Cincinnati’s College of Design, Architecture, Art and Planning. She lives in a 1925 craftsman bungalow in the Riverview Historic District.

 

Robin Dushane

Historic Preservation Officer

Eastern Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma

Wyandotte, Oklahoma

Robin serves the Eastern Shawnee Tribe as the Tribal Historic Preservation Officer. She re-established the Preservation Department ten years ago and currently manages a staff of six individuals. Within the oversight of the department is language revitalization, issues related to the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), consultation with federal agencies under Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act, and presentation of monthly cultural events. Prior to this post she was a public school educator for sixteen years.

Karen Dye
Newkirk Main Street

Newkirk, Oklahoma

Karen has served as the Program Manager for Newkirk Main Street Inc. since 1995. She is also an abstractor for Albright Abstract & Title Guaranty and the Historical Editor for the Newkirk Herald Journal. She holds a Master of Liberal Studies from the University of Oklahoma and degrees from Northern Oklahoma College and the University of Central Oklahoma. Her numerous publications include Newkirk Carved in Stone (1993) and Politics and Greed? Allotments and Town Building Schemes in the Cherokee Outlet in The Chronicles of Oklahoma (Fall 1995). Karen regularly provides presentations at national, regional, and state conferences concerning community revitalization and historic preservation; completes research for exhibits; and advocates for preservation of local landmarks. She is active in numerous professional and civic organizations, including the Oklahoma Foundation for the Humanities, Board of Directors 1990-1996; Oklahoma Museum Association, Board of Directors 1996-1999; Newkirk Community Historical Society Board of Directors 1980-present; Pioneer Woman Museum, Ponca City, OK Board of Directors 1985 -2001; Newkirk Main Street Authority, Chairman of Board, 1992-1994; and the Oklahoma Historical Society.

 

Kate Ellison

Archeologist

Bureau of Reclamation

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Kate is an archeologist for the Bureau of Reclamation’s Oklahoma City office. She grew up in a very small town of 1000 people in northern Minnesota, and her parents owned and operated a three-story wooden hotel built in 1899. Her dad was a blacksmith and welder. She attended undergraduate school at Mankato State University in southern Minnesota. After spending a weekend surveying on an archeological crew associated with the university, she decided that she wanted to major in archeology and she earned her Bachelor’s degree in anthropology and Spanish and earned her Master’s degree in Anthropology at the University of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Her most interesting job was working as an archeologist for the Wisconsin Department of Transportation while going to grad school. It involved a new highway project near La Crosse that required mitigation of archeological sites that contained prehistoric long houses and human remains along their outside walls.

 

Richard A. (Rick) Fields

Assistant Field Manager for Multi-Resources

Oklahoma Field Office

Bureau of Land Management

Tulsa, Oklahoma

Rick is the Assistant Field Manager for Multi-Resources for the Bureau of Land Management’s Oklahoma Field Office. The Multi-Resources division is responsible for compliance work and inspections covering both environmental and cultural resources for the Field Office’s area of responsibility in Oklahoma, Kansas, and Texas. Before assuming his role as the AFM, he also worked as the lead archeologist for the Oklahoma Field Office. Previous to joining the BLM, he worked for the Forest Service, Cherokee National Historical Society, Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, and the Oklahoma Historical Society. Rick holds a MS in Industrial Archaeology from Michigan Technological University, and a BS in History from Northern Michigan University.

Ron Frantz

Associate Professor/Director of

Great Plains Studios

Institute for Quality Communities

College of Architecture

University of Oklahoma

Norman, Oklahoma

Ron is a licensed architect who specializes in historic preservation, Main Street revitalization, neighborhood revitalization, and all types of community-based, grassroots design programs. With two degrees from The Tulane University of Louisiana, his work experience includes founding two architecture firms, working in private sector firms, staffing a local non-profit organization, and working for a state agency as well as holding staff and faculty positions at a private college.

Currently, Ron is an Associate Professor with the Architecture Division, and is Director of Great Plains Studios, a part of the Institute for Quality Communities in the University of Oklahoma’s College of Architecture. As a citizen, Ron volunteers with many organizations in his community. After almost 30 years of living in historic streetcar neighborhoods flanking Route 66, he and his wife, Mary, currently are working on their fifth house in a great, but aging, 1960’s suburban neighborhood in Oklahoma City.

 

Bob Fraser

CEO

Woolaroc Museum & Wildlife Preserve

The Frank Phillips Foundation, Inc.

Bartlesville, Oklahoma

Since October 1, 2006, Bob has served as CEO of The Frank Phillips Foundation and Woolaroc Museum & Wildlife Preserve. In this capacity, he oversees the operations and marketing of Woolaroc, a 3,700 acre ranch listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Woolaroc includes a world-class museum, the historic lodge home, buffalo, longhorn, elk and various other free roaming species. Woolaroc was founded in 1925 and is one of Oklahoma’s leading tourist attractions. Bob is active in numerous civic organizations, including service as President of the Bartlesville Development Authority, past Chairman of the Bartlesville Community Center Trust Authority, and advisory Board Member for Visitor’s Inc. Bob is a graduate of the University of Tulsa.

 

Katie Friddle

Historic Preservation Officer

Comprehensive Planning and Urban Design Division

City of Oklahoma City

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Since September 2012, Katie has served as the Preservation Officer for the City of Oklahoma City. She provides staff support to the City’s Historic Preservation Commission, serves as the City’s Certified Local Government Coordinator, and participates in other preservation efforts within the Planning Department. A native Oklahoman, Katie holds a Bachelor’s degree in History from the University of Oklahoma and a Master’s degree in Historic Preservation from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation. Prior to her time with the City, Katie was Executive Director of Preservation Oklahoma, the statewide non-profit preservation advocacy organization.

 

Barbara Garrison

Bartlesville Booksters

Bartlesville, Oklahoma

Barbara is a native of Bartlesville, attended the University of Oklahoma, and married Denzil Garrison, a lawyer and Oklahoma State Senator. They have 5 children and 16 grandchildren, and 2 great grandchildren. She for a short period of time worked for Phillips Petroleum and has been involved in volunteering in the community, particularly the Bartlesville Area History Museum. Barbara, Vicki Stewart, and Debbie Neece worked together to publish the Washington County Family History Book and If Bartlesville Walls Could Talk; Early Families & Historic Homes of Bartlesville.

 

Jim Goss

Director

Frank Phillips Home

Bartlesville, Oklahoma

Jim is the Director of the Frank Phillips Home in Bartlesville and has served in that position since January of 2005. He also is adjunct instructor of U.S. History at Tulsa Community College. Jim is a retired Tulsa classroom teacher of U.S. and Oklahoma History, past adjunct instructor for the University of Tulsa’s School of Education, and former registrar at the Bartlesville Area History Museum. He received his Bachelor of Arts and Master of Education degrees from Northeastern State University and has additional graduate work in museum studies. Jim is a graduate of Leadership Bartlesville XVI, and is on the Oklahoma Museums Association Board of Directors. He has presented at numerous museum programs and conferences, and he began the statewide Frank Phillips Home Museum Professionals Conference in 2012.

 

Amy Haley

Director of Marketing and Development

Price Tower Arts Center

Bartlesville, Oklahoma

Amy has been on staff at the Price Tower Arts Center for over 2 years. In her time there, she has been involved in many aspects of the building’s operations, which has given her a unique perspective. Her love for the building and the mission spans the marketing, development, and administrative aspects, as well as serving as a tour guide. Amy came to the Price Tower with a diverse background including a degree in English and 10 years of experience in marketing, public relations, grant writing and non-profit marketing and development.

 

Bruce Hall

President

Miller Neighborhood Association

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Bruce is an 18 year resident of Miller Neighborhood and has been active with the Neighborhood Association and assisted in preparation of the National Register of Historic Places nomination for the district. He is a graduate of Oklahoma State University. He has received multiple awards including The Oklahoma Neighborhood Hall of Fame Winner at the Oklahoma Neighborhood Conference in 2007 and in 2012 he received the Neighborhood Alliance’s Neighbor of the year award.

 

Roy Hamilton

Cherokee Nation

Tahlequah, Oklahoma

Roy is a citizen of the Cherokee Nation. He is a Special Projects Officer for the Cherokee Nation Office of the Secretary of State, a Cherokee family history specialist, and Cherokee history and preservation lecturer. He is the author of Ned Christie, Cherokee Warrior, 1852-1892.” He co-edited and designed the book Cherokee Writers from the Flint Hills of Oklahoma: An Anthology.

He served as Cherokee Heritage Center interim executive director, and president of the governing body, he retired from the board in 2011. He was awarded the Oklahoma Governor’s Award for public service. Roy founded the Cherokee Arts & Humanities Council in 2006 and served as president and executive director for six years.

He is co-manager of the Cherokee Nation History & Humanities Course.

 

Melissa Harjo-Moffer

Archives and Records Technician

Muscogee (Creek) Nation

Historic and Cultural Preservation Department

Okmulgee, Oklahoma

Melissa is the Archive and Records Technician for the Muscogee (Creek) Nation National Library and Archives. She obtains and secures books, photographs and records pertaining to the tribe’s history to curate in its archival collection. She is the archivist for her family as well.

Melissa considers herself a traditional Mvskokean because she was raised in a native speaking environment; her first language being the Mvskoke language. As a fluent Mvskoke speaker, she is also able to read and write in the native language which enables her to immerse herself in all facets of the Mvskoke culture. Her cultural upbringing contributes to her already unparalleled desire to preserve the traditions of her Mvskoke people.

 

Margaret Hess

Owner

Hess Townhomes LLC

Okmulgee, Oklahoma

Margaret is a lifelong resident of Okmulgee and serves as President-elect of Okmulgee Main Street, Inc. She and her husband Rob purchased the 99 year old McBrayer Building on the Square in June 2014, sparking a revitalization of the community known as #okmulgeerising. She is sharing her story and journey through a blog at “Bringbackthemac.com”. Combining sweat equity, preservation research, education and a passion for her hometown, Margaret is an example of how a hometown girl can work with the resources and support of SHPO staff to move forward and utilize the Preservation Tax Credits to repurpose a building and breathe new life into a community.

 

Michelle C. Horn

Archaeologist

Environmental Analysis and Compliance Branch

US Army Corps of Engineers, Tulsa District

Tulsa, Oklahoma

Michelle received her M.A. in Anthropology (Archaeology) from the University of Oklahoma in 2006 and began working with the U. S. Army corps of Engineers, Tulsa District in 2007. As an archaeologist in the Operations Division, she co-manages District compliance with relevant historic preservation and cultural resources laws and regulations at the 38 Tulsa District Operating Projects (reservoirs, locks and dams, etc) and their associated lands, which total over 1 million acres. Michelle also supports cultural resources compliance for the Regulatory program, manages the curation of Tulsa District archaeological collections pursuant to 36 CFR Part 79 in multiple repositories, and manages the District NAGPRA program.

 

Ryan Howell

Archeologist

Bureau of Land Management

Tulsa, Oklahoma

Ryan completed undergraduate work at the University of Oklahoma prior to obtaining a Master’s degree from the University of Arizona. He has been employed with the federal government for six years. He currently serves as archeologist for the Bureau of Land Management.

 

Diane Hunter

Assistant tribal Historic Preservation Officer

Miami tribe of Oklahoma

Miami, Oklahoma

Diane is the newly appointed Assistant Tribal Historic Preservation Officer for the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma and is stationed at the tribe’s Cultural Resources Extension Office near her childhood home in Indiana. Prior to coming to work for the Miami Tribe, she was a librarian for 30 years. She holds a Bachelors of Arts in German from Indiana University, a Master’s of Library Science from Ball State University, and a Master’s of Science in Linguistics from Georgetown University.

 

Johnnie Jacobs

Manager

Muscogee (Creek) Nation

Historic and Cultural Preservation Department

Okmulgee, Oklahoma

Johnnie is the Manager of the Historic and Cultural Preservation Department for the Muscogee (Creek) Nation and is also a tribal member.  She received her Bachelor and Master’s in Anthropology from the University of Oklahoma. She has worked in the field of cultural preservation, museums, and public outreach for many years. In her role as the Manager of Historic Preservation for the Muscogee (Creek) Nation she oversees several programs and projects including Section 106 Review, NAGPRA, Cemetery Preservation, Cultural Preservation GIS mapping, Tribal Archaeology, Outreach and the National Library and Archives. She enjoys building relationships and partnerships with community members and the public in Oklahoma and throughout the Muscogee (Creek) Nation homelands in the southeastern United States while preserving and protecting the Tribe’s valuable cultural resources for future generations.

 

Melody A. Kellogg

Manager of Library Operations
Metropolitan Library System – Edmond

Edmond, Oklahoma

Melody is Manager of Library Operations for Metropolitan Library System’s Edmond branch. For 13 years, she worked in community and downtown revitalization with Oklahoma Department of Commerce’s Main Street Program. She continued a similar path by working for the City of Guthrie 11 years in various positions involving organizational development, grant-writing, historic preservation, project coordination, and library and city management. She followed her stint as City Manager with a two-year sabbatical to the ministry in 2009, rejoining the library ranks in 2011. Melody holds Masters Degrees in Business Administration and Library and Information Studies.

 

Mark Larson

Mark Larson Development

Tulsa, Oklahoma

Mark is a real estate developer focused on rehabilitation of historic buildings. He attended the University of Oklahoma where he studied criminal justice and law. Then, he operated several successful businesses in Oklahoma City and Tulsa in addition to participating in various real estate ventures. For the past eight years Mark has concentrated on real estate development, particularly in the use of the historic rehabilitation tax credits. He began historic tax credit development in Richmond, Virginia, where he completed five projects. He plans to utilize the knowledge and experience gained in Virginia to preserve historic buildings in Oklahoma. He is currently rehabilitating the historic Chevrolet Dealership in Tulsa for 83 units, completed in December 2014. Future projects include development of the original Jane Phillips Memorial Hospital in Bartlesville, and the recently acquired Haskell Building in Muskogee.

 

Chris Lilly

Principal

Lilly Architects

Tulsa, Oklahoma

Chris is the founding principal of Lilly Architects located in Tulsa. He is a graduate of Oklahoma State University and has worked across a broad range of project types including mixed-use, hotel and residential, education, museums, healthcare and research, civic and cultural, master planning, adaptive reuse and historic preservation.

Chris has collaborated on several notable projects, including The Tulsa Paper Company Historic Rehabilitation and Guthrie Green in Tulsa; the Sidra Medical Center in Doha, Qatar; The Tokyo American Club in Tokyo, Japan.

He is a versatile architect with a balance of design and technical expertise. Chris’s interest in building technologies has spearheaded the efforts within Lilly Architects in design-construction integration through 3D scanning and Building Information Modeling (BIM) systems. He intends to extend this technology in a preservation effort to 3D scan Oklahoma’s most notable and at-risk historical heritage sites.

 

Larry B. Lucas

Architect

Oklahoma Main Street Center

Oklahoma Department of Commerce

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Larry is the staff architect for the Oklahoma Main Street Program. He grew up on the historic Oklahoma Main Street of Poteau, where his family rehabilitated a historic building for the family business. Since then, “Things feel like they have come full circle”, and he feels truly blessed to be helping the people of Oklahoma with both their businesses and their town’s cultural heritage. In the world of architecture and design, Larry most enjoys existing structures and the aspects of historic preservation. He believes that, “existing properties create a wonderful assortment of opportunities and creative constraints”. They are also incredibly rich in embodied energy, that is, the actual energy expended and contained within the building. Being coined a “building hugger” suits him just fine. He has been well-acquainted with environmental stewardship since early childhood. Larry worked through all the ranks of Scouting from Tiger Cubs through Eagle Scout with strong family support, and later gained his Bachelor of Architecture, with a focus on Sustainability, at the University of Oklahoma. Larry became a licensed Architect in the State of Oklahoma in 2012.

 

Richard J. (Rick) Lueb

Principal

TAP Architecture

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Rick is a principal at TAP Architecture and has been with the firm from its inception over twenty five years ago. He is a Fellow of the Construction Specification Institute and a graduate with distinction from the University of Oklahoma with dual degrees in Construction Science and Architecture. Rick is a licensed architect in Arkansas and Oklahoma and is a registered interior designer in Oklahoma. He also holds certifications from CSI in Construction Specifications and Construction Contract Administration. His architectural expertise is enhanced by more than 20 years in the construction industry as a job superintendent and owner of various construction companies. Rick’s previous experiences as a certified professional builder, realtor, and journeyman level electrician form a broad based construction background that brings special insight and real-world value to the design team. His expertise is evident in award-winning Historic Preservation and Rehabilitation projects including Historic Old Central on the campus of OSU, the Oklahoma Judicial Center on the State Capitol Campus, and the restoration of earthquake damage on St. Gregory University’s Benedictine Hall. He is currently involved in the Rehabilitation of the historic Santa Fe Station in downtown Oklahoma City as it converts to an Intermodal Transportation Hub.

Dayna McCoy

Owner

McCoy Building LLC

Bartlesville, Oklahoma

Dana has been in the retail jewelry business since 1981. She purchased the building at 304-306 S. Dewey in 2003 and started refurbishing 306 to become McCoy Jewelers. Then she refurbished two upstairs apartments 304 1/2 and 306 1/2 into 1100 square feet loft apartments, each with two bedrooms. Original doors and trim and an old claw foot bathtub were retained, and the original floors were refinished. In 2014, she completed the restoration at 304 S Dewey and converted it into an 1800 sq. ft. retail or service space and a storage room for McCoy Jewelers in the back.

 

Julie Miner

Principal Economic Development Planner

INCOG

Tulsa, Oklahoma

Julie grew up in a military family and learned to appreciate planning and preservation along the way. She graduated from the University of Houston and later moved to Tulsa. She received her Master of Public Administration degree from the University of Oklahoma and Certifications from the National Development Council in Housing and Economic Development Finance. Julie worked as a program manager at the Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa and was the founding director of Sapulpa Arts (Council). She assisted the City of Sapulpa with its successful Oklahoma Main Street application and served as the executive director for 7 years overseeing many building rehabilitations and the creation of new businesses and residences. During this time Sapulpa received 14 OMSP awards including Economic Restructuring and best Public/Private Partnership. Since 1997, Julie has worked at both INCOG and the City of Tulsa as an economic development professional and initiated or assisted in various projects including the Vision 2025 Route 66 package that provided $15M for improvements for the historic route in Tulsa County, expansion of the state historic tax credit, and development of adaptive reuse projects in Tulsa for commercial and residential projects. Julie is active in professional and civic organizations and the recipient of numerous awards.

Rachel Mosman

Photo Archivist

Research Center

Oklahoma Historical Society

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Rachel was born in Shawnee, and earned her Bachelor of Arts in English and Masters of Library and Information Studies at the University of Oklahoma. She began as an Intern with the Oklahoma Historical Society in 2006 and became the Photographic Archivist with the Research Division in 2009. In addition, she has continued her education in the field by attending the Image Permanence Institute at the Rochester Institute of Technology. Rachel is also an Adjunct Professor in English at Rose State College.

Jonita Mullins

Okie Heritage History Tours

Muskogee, Oklahoma

Jonita grew up in Haskell, Oklahoma. After graduating from Haskell High School, she attended Oklahoma State University, earning a bachelor’s degree in English. She worked for several years in Tulsa in publishing and then in banking. She realized a dream when she purchased a historic home in Muskogee’s Founders’ Place Historical District. Jonita serves on the Muskogee Historic Preservation Commission. For the past twelve years, she has written a weekly column on area history for the Muskogee Phoenix newspaper. With the Phoenix she received the Distinguished Editorial Award from the Oklahoma Heritage Association. She has also received the Oklahoma Governor’s Commendation for Preservation of Oklahoma History. Jonita has published a history of her hometown titled Haskell: A Centennial Celebration. A second book, Glimpses of Our Past is a compilation of over 80 of her Phoenix articles.  Her latest book titled Journey to an Untamed Land is a novel that recounts the story of the first missionaries and schoolteachers in Oklahoma working among the Osage. Its sequel, Look Unto the Fields, is set for release in Spring 2015. She is a frequent speaker on topics relating to Oklahoma history and historic preservation.

Timothy Neville-Lee

Alford Hall Monaghan Morris

726 West Sheridan, Suite 140

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Timothy is an associate with Allford Hall Monaghan Morris, an architectural practice founded in London in 1989, now with 320 staff and an established international reputation. The practice has broad experience in new-build, re-use and conservation projects, ranging across the arts, education, healthcare, office and residential sectors. Timothy joined AHMM in 2005 and in 2012 accepted a Secondment to the practice’s Oklahoma office to support their development in response to growing opportunities in the area. Since then, he has worked on a wide range of projects, including Mosaic multi-family, private houses, OKSea shipping container development, Lake Texoma Dockominiums, and the Rock Island Plow Building.

 

Lynda Ozan

Architectural Historian

State Historic Preservation Office

Oklahoma Historical Society

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Lynda is the Architectural Historian and National Register Program Coordinator for the Oklahoma State Historic Preservation Office. An Ohio native, Lynda has degrees in both history and historic preservation; and brings over 15 years of preservation experience to the State of Oklahoma. Lynda’s research interests span architectural and cultural history and colonial America. She has conducted research in the area of westward expansion settlement patterns; indentured servitude; and modern architectural styles. Her research contributes to our understanding of the relationships between people and place, as well as the character of different places. She is the author of many National Register of Historic Places nominations, articles and journal publications and most recently a context for post WWII housing from 1946-1976 in Oklahoma.

 

David Pettyjohn

Executive Director

Preservation Oklahoma, Inc.

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

David is the Executive Director of Preservation Oklahoma, Inc. (POK), a position he has held since October 2012. Prior to joining POK, he worked with the Oklahoma Humanities Council. David holds an M.A. in History and a B.A. in History/Secondary Education, both from the University of Tulsa. He currently serves on the Board of the Oklahoma City Foundation for Architecture and the Advisory Board of the Oklahoma Archeological Survey.

 

  1. Michelle Place

Executive Director

Tulsa Historical Society

Tulsa, Oklahoma

Michelle is the Tulsa Historical Society’s executive director, a position she has held since 2012. She served as the organization’s business manager from 2001 until assuming her current duties. She is a native of Little Rock, Arkansas and a graduate of the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville.

Michelle is the founding Chair of Experience Tulsa Coalition (ETC.), which includes: Tulsa Performing Arts Center, Route 66 Alliance, Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art, Tulsa Botanical Gardens, Tulsa Air & Space Museum, and the Tulsa Historical Society & Museum. She serves on the Metro Tulsa Chamber of Commerce, Tourism Task Force and is active in numerous civic and professional organizations. Michelle is a frequent speaker about the history of Tulsa for tourist groups and community events.

 

Cynthia Savage

Architectural Historian

Architectural Resources and Community

Heritage (A.R.C.H.) Consulting

Pocasset, Oklahoma

Cindy has been involved in historic preservation in Oklahoma for over twenty years. She received her Master of Arts degree in Applied History from Oklahoma State University and her Bachelor of Arts in History from Colorado State University. Cindy worked for the Oklahoma State Historic Preservation Office for five years in the mid-1990s. For the past sixteen and a half years, she has operated her own preservation consulting firm, A.R.C.H. (Architectural Resources and Community Heritage) Consulting.

 

Ed Sharrer
Kendall-Whittier Main Street

Tulsa, Oklahoma

Ed is Executive Director of Kendall Whittier Main Street in Tulsa and has broad-based experience in historic preservation, city planning, marketing and promotions. Prior to KWMS, he was a city planner for the City of Tulsa, serving as the co-lead planner for the update of the City of Tulsa Zoning Code and staff to the Tulsa Preservation Commission. During his five years as a staff member of the Certified Local Government program, Ed worked with hundreds of homeowners on historic rehabilitation projects. He has a Bachelor’s in Marketing from The University of Tulsa and a Master’s degree from the University of Oklahoma Urban Design Studio. In 2014, he received the Watonga Bob Shoemaker Award as Oklahoma Main Street’s Program Manager of the Year.

 

Pam Shelton
Director

Yukon’s Best Main Street

Yukon, Oklahoma

Since July 2014, Pam has served as Yukon’s Best Main Street Director, an Associate Program of Oklahoma Main Street. The organization is working to revitalize Yukon’s Best Main Street, Historic Route 66, to become a cultural, shopping, and “go to” place in Yukon. Pam loves history, and she chaired the committee to “Relight the Mill” on Yukon’s Best Flour Mill sign. They turned the sign off in June 2012, raised over $250,000 and turned it back on in June 2013. It shines brightly over Yukon. Pam retired from public education after a 39-year career teaching Vocational Home Economics and Marketing and serving as the Yukon Public School Community Education Director. She received a BS from Oklahoma State University in Vocational Home Economics and a MS from the University of Central Oklahoma in Community Services. Pam enjoys volunteer work and is active in numerous professional and civic organizations.

 

Ken Shingleton

Archeologist

Corps of Engineers, Tulsa District

Tulsa, Oklahoma

Ken is an archaeologist with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Tulsa District and a graduate of the University of Tulsa. His experience with the Corps consists of eight years at St. Louis District and 14 years with Tulsa District.

 

Harry Simms

Historic Preservation Architect

State Historic Preservation Office

Oklahoma Historical Society

Oklahoma History Center

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Harry has been a licensed Architect for 30 years. He holds a Master of Architecture degree from the University of Illinois and has practiced in Oklahoma, Texas, and Illinois in the private construction sector, as well as working for the Department of the Army and working as a defense contract employee for the Air Force. For the last eight years Harry has worked as the Historic Preservation Architect for the Oklahoma SHPO.

 

Bruce E. Smith

Financial Advisor

Ameriprise Financial

Pawhuska, Oklahoma

Bruce is a Financial Advisor with Ameriprise Financial. He attended New Mexico Military Institute from 1976-1978 and received his associates degree. He continued his education at Howard Payne University receiving his Bachelor’s degree in 1980. Bruce served in the United States Army from 1980 until 1992. Bruce’s love for real estate began as a hobby. He has completed many renovations on several investment properties. He has completely rehabilitated three historic buildings, two in Pawhuska and one in Bartlesville.

 

Ryan L. Spring

GIS/GPS Specialist

Historic Preservation Department

Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma

Durant, Oklahoma

Ryan is the GIS/GPS Specialist for the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma Historic Preservation Department. He began work for the Tribe after receiving his Bachelor’s Degree in Anthropology from the University of Arkansas in fall of 2011. His job duties include using GIS (Geographic Information System) and GPS (Global Positioning System) technology to aid in protecting sites important to Choctaw people, creating cultural maps for education, and conducting Choctaw cultural presentations, research, and advisement. Ryan also enjoys playing Choctaw stickball for the Choctaw Nation’s Stickball Team as well as helping coach stickball to youth and adults in his community.

 

Vicki Stewart

Co-author of If Bartlesville Walls Could Talk

Bartlesville, Oklahoma

Vicki and her family moved to Bartlesville in 1980, and she taught in the Bartlesville School System for 18 years before retiring. She has been involved in volunteering in the community since retirement, particularly the Frank Phillips Home & Bartlesville Area History Museum. Vicki, Barbara Garrison, and Debbie Neece worked together to publish the Washington County Family History Book and If Bartlesville Walls Could Talk; Early Families & Historic Homes of Bartlesville.

George Strack

Tribal Historic Preservation Officer

Miami Tribe of Oklahoma

Miami, Oklahoma

George is a citizen of the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma and has served as the Tribal Historic Preservation Officer (THPO) since 2008. He is a member of the Miami Tribe’s Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Committee and the Tribe’s Cemetery Committee. George received a B.A. in Public Policy from the Native American Educational Services College, and he is a veteran of the United States Air Force.

 

Kelly Tompkins
Director

Main Street Enid, Inc.

Enid, Oklahoma

Kelly is the Director of Main Street Enid, a non-profit organization whose mission is the revitalization of Downtown Enid through organization, design, promotion and economic restructuring. She helps make the heart of her hometown a place where residents and visitors want to shop, dine, be entertained and do business while surrounded by the character of the historic square. Kelly is an active participant in the Enid Visual Arts Commission, Enid Arts Council, and Enid First Team. She is a Vance AFB Honorary Commander and a member of Leadership Arts Class 8.

 

David Wanzer

David Wanzer Development

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

David is an Oklahoma City-based developer and designer with a passion for modern architecture, adaptive re-use and community building. He was born in Oklahoma City’s Midtown district, at St. Anthony Hospital, and raised in Guthrie. He earned a bachelor’s degree in finance from Oklahoma State University in 1992, a second bachelor’s degree, in environmental design, at The University of Oklahoma (2002), followed by a Master of Architecture degree from the OU College of Architecture (2004). Community building is at the heart of David’s work. His research into a long forgotten stretch of Sheridan Avenue in downtown Oklahoma City uncovered the rich history of a district that was once a central hub for Hollywood movie distribution in the U.S. This research, along with his design firm, helped developer friend Chip Fudge spearhead the revitalization of the City’s now thriving Film Row District. In 2006, Wanzer was awarded a prestigious “Honor Award” from the American Institute of Architects Central Oklahoma Chapter for the design and construction of the 1105 Modern Bungalows project located in the Classen Ten Penn Neighborhood. The project, his masters’ thesis project at OU, was in partnership with Oklahoma City’s Neighborhood Services. David serves on the Board of Directors for Film Row, the Business Improvement District Board for Downtown OKC, Inc. and the Board of Trustees for Price Tower in Bartlesville.

 

Chad Williams

Director

Research Division

Oklahoma Historical Society

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Chad is the Director of the Oklahoma Historical Society’s Research Division and

has been instrumental in the development of the OHS online research catalog which includes a variety of digitized records. Prior to assuming the division director position, Chad served in several capacities, including deputy division director and manuscript archivist. He was a Research Division volunteer for three years before becoming a full-time OHS staff member. Chad holds Bachelor of Arts degrees in History and Public Administration and a Masters in Public Administration from the University of Oklahoma. His master’s thesis is entitled Digitization in the Archives of the Oklahoma Historical Society.

 

Chris Wilson

Director

Downtown Bartlesville, Inc.

Bartlesville, Oklahoma

Chris is Director of Downtown Development for the Bartlesville Redevelopment Trust Authority and Downtown Bartlesville, Inc., the Main Street Program in Bartlesville. He has served as a professional in the field of downtown and urban district revitalization and development for more than 25 years in four states. He was the director of the first urban Main Street programs in Texas and Oklahoma as well as director of two rural programs in Virginia and Tennessee. He was also one of three professionals hired by the City of Oklahoma City to revitalize the downtown area devastated by the 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building. Chris uses his abilities to facilitate all types of dynamic projects that create downtowns that don’t just exist, but thrive. Over his career he has led commercial districts to attract and recruit more than 150 new independent businesses in both rural and urban markets; worked with property and business owners to improve over 450 buildings; and created countless retail and special events that attract thousands of people. One of his innovative projects was in partnership with Google, creating “3D Downtown.” It resulted in the creation of 165 three-dimensional building models of downtown McMinnville, TN that were uploaded to Google Earth. The models, created by more than 40 volunteers, were used for planning building improvements, public improvements, business recruitment and tourism activities. The project was given special recognition as a Case Study by Google Enterprise and was identified by the National League of Cities as a “best practice.” Chris holds a Bachelor of Arts in Communications and a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Graphic Design from Westminster College in Fulton, Missouri. He has certifications in Professional Downtown Management from the National Trust Main Street Center and in Facilitation and Strategic Planning from the Institute of Cultural Affairs.

 

Jeremy Zeller

Oklahoma Main Street Center

Oklahoma Department of Commerce

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Jeremy is an Economic Developer for the Oklahoma Main Street Program. He has worked at the Oklahoma Department of Commerce for over 10 years with involvement in the Site Ready Program and Main Street. His skills are strong in the retail and restaurant industry, and he goes to communities and helps businesses through one on one consultations.

TOURS

Full conference program and registration information will be mailed from Bartlesville in a few days and made available at http://www.okhistory.org/shpo/conference.htm.  In the meantime, here is a preview of the tour opportunities you will have.
(NOTE: All tours return to the Bartlesville Community Center in time for afternoon sessions, include lunch, require reservations, and are limited to 40 participants.)

Wednesday, June 3

10:00am-12:30pm

Tour #1: Design for the Continuous Present: Frank Lloyd Wright & Bruce Goff in Bartlesville

Bartlesville has the unique legacy of two of America’s foremost modern architects, Frank Lloyd Wright and Bruce Goff.  Explore how Frank Lloyd Wright came to Oklahoma. See the private areas of the Price Tower and the creative reuse as a hotel and Arts Center. Wright’s legacy continues with the Bartlesville Community Center designed by Taliesen Associated Architecture. Continue exploring this remarkable legacy with the work of Bruce Goff.  You will see the exteriors of several homes, visit Holy Redeemer Church, and enjoy a picnic lunch in the shadow of Goff’s newly restored Play Tower in Sooner Park. Sponsored by Price Connors and Marty Smith.

 

Tours with Lunch/Thursday, June 4

Tour #2: History Among the Headstones: White Rose Cemetery & Mausoleum (Bus Tour)

White Rose Cemetery, established in 1899, is the final resting place for many of Bartlesville’s pioneers as well as a few renegades. The guided tour will focus on the cemetery’s headstones and their symbols and on those interred. Participants will visit the 1923 Neoclassical Revival style mausoleum which features ornamental leaded glass windows, bronze doors and imported white marble. Enjoy a box lunch in the shade of the gazebo as you learn about headstone restoration efforts at the cemetery. Wear comfortable shoes.

Tour #3: Living History: Bartlesville Heritage Trail (Walking Tour)

Listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1991, the Bartlesville Downtown Historic District is a treasure trove for preservation professionals, architectural enthusiasts and history buffs alike. This walking tour leads you through a downtown that cherishes its historic traditions while embracing its transition to the future. You will learn about Bartlesville’s past and also explore the exciting changes that are moving these traditional buildings into modern uses. The tour features the interiors of several buildings. Each tour participant will receive a complimentary copy of the Bartlesville Heritage Trail booklet, a 2010 recipient of the SHPO’s Citation of Merit. Wear comfortable shoes and dress for the elements.

Tours with Lunch/Friday, June 5

Tour #4: Into the 20th Century: Bartlesville’s Modern Architecture (Bus Tour): Bartlesville, founded just before the turn of the 20th Century, soon became one of the most prosperous oil producing regions in the world. Explore the East Coast taste for classical buildings developed into Art Deco and the explosion of mid-century modernism by Frank Lloyd Wright, Taliesen Associated Architecture, Clifford May, Hellmuth, Obata and Kassabaum, and Thomas McCory. Trace the development of 20th Century Architecture from classical to organic.

Tour #5: Bartlesville’s Oily Past: From Oil Wells to Automobiles (Bus Tour, limited walking)

Bartlesville traces its past to oil, starting with the Nellie Johnstone #1, the first commercial oil well in Oklahoma, to the rise of the automobile and its dependence on gasoline. Phillips Petroleum Company, founded in 1917, imprints the city with its presence – from the original buildings that housed its humble beginnings to the current sprawling corporate complex in downtown. You will start your tour with a re-enactment of the Nellie Johnstone’s big blowout, and end with a tour of the Frank Phillips Home. In between you will view numerous architectural treasures that housed Bartlesville’s “oily” past.

Self-guided Tours/Thursday, June 4 and Friday, June 5

Explore Bartlesville through a self-guided tour with lunch on your own. Tour brochures are available in the conference registration area at the Bartlesville Community Center. Choices include walking tours (W) and driving tours requiring personal transportation (T):

W – Cherokee Avenue Historic Homes Tour, Free, 1 hour

W/T- Frank Phillips Home, $5, Guided, 90 minutes.

W – Bartlesville Area History Museum, Free, 90 minutes

W- Phillips Petroleum Company Museum, Free, 90 minutes

W – Price Tower Tour, $12, Guided, 2 hours

T – Woolaroc, Bartlesville, OK, $10, 2-4 hours

T – La Quinta Mansion, Bartlesville, OK, Free, 60 minutes

T – Dewey Hotel Museum, Dewey, OK, $3, 2 hours

T – Tom Mix Museum, Dewey, OK, Free, 2 hours

Elm Street: It’s Not Just Main Street for Neighborhoods

As we watch Main Street succeed in historic commercial district revitalization in dozens of Oklahoma towns and in hundreds of communities nationwide, local leaders wonder how to achieve similar results in residential areas. A featured session in Tradition and Transition: Oklahoma’s 27th Annual Statewide Preservation Conference (Bartlesville, June 3-5) addresses the question.

Too many of the nation’s urban neighborhoods have fallen into disrepair. Disinvestment, outmigration and aftershocks of urban renewal have left many of these history-rich communities battling for survival. Julie Fitzpatrick, Assistant Director/Special Projects Coordinator, Pennsylvania Downtown Center (PDC), will discuss her agency’s Program (initiated in 2004) in “Elm Street: It’s Not Just Main Street for Neighborhoods” on Thursday morning, June 4.

The PDC recognized that these “core communities” are a major untapped asset, and with help from an Elm Street program, these historic, authentic and unique neighborhoods can once again thrive, supporting the downtowns and commercial districts that they surround. Similar to the Four Point Main Street approach, the five point Elm Street approach includes safe, clean and green; neighbors and economy; design; image and identity; and sustainable organization (read more at http://www.padowntown.org).

At PDC, Julie facilitates community visioning, develops regional downtown revitalization strategies, establishes tourism infrastructure plans for heritage corridors, and develops business improvement district plans and other strategic planning activities. Currently, she is working with PA Department of Conservation and Natural Resources on a project focused on Nature-Based Place-making. She joined the PDC in 2005, and has a master’s degree in Community and Regional Planning and a Bachelor of Arts degree in Art History and Anthropology, all from Temple University.

For more information about the conference, contact Melvena Heisch, Deputy SHPO, at

405/522-4484 or mheisch@okhistory.org or Chris Wilson, Director, Downtown Bartlesville, Inc. at 918/766-4847 or cwilson@downtownbartlesvilleinc.org. Also, visit http://www.okhistory.org/shpo/conference.htm and read the conference blog at https://okpreservationconference.wordpress.com.

PRESERVATION CONFERENCE FEATURES TRIBAL PROGRAMS

Many tribal governments have established historic preservation programs, and some have assumed State Historic Preservation Office responsibilities for historic properties on their tribal lands as provided in the National Historic Preservation Act. The Tribal Historic Preservation Officer (THPO) is the official appointed by the governing authority of a tribe that has assumed all or any part of the responsibilities of the SHPO. The THPO title is often used for individuals administering cultural resource programs for tribes that have not assumed SHPO duties. Tribes play a critical role in the national preservation program.
Tribal preservation programs will be featured on Thursday, June 4, during one of the three tracks of sessions at Tradition and Transition: Oklahoma’s 27th Annual Statewide Preservation Conference (Bartlesville, June 3-5). That morning, James Bird, Chief, Tribal Preservation Program, and Joe Watkins, Supervisory Anthropologist and Chief, Tribal Relations and American Cultures, both with the National Park Service, U. S. Department of the Interior, will discuss federal and tribal preservation partnerships. Valerie Hauser, Director, Office of Native American Affairs, Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, will explain how the ACHP, the independent federal agency that administers the review of federal undertakings per the NHPA, works with tribes.

In the afternoon representatives of several Oklahoma tribes will talk about the challenges they face in protecting the places of special importance to them. They will also share their many successes and detail the programs they have initiated to document and preserve tribal heritage. These sessions offer an opportunity for Oklahoma’s broad preservation community to learn about tribal concerns and to find ways to increase collaboration among all of the state’s preservation partners.

For more information about the conference, contact Melvena Heisch, Deputy SHPO, at 405/522-4484 or mheisch@okhistory.org or Chris Wilson, Director, Downtown Bartlesville, Inc. at 918/766-4847 or cwilson@downtownbartlesvilleinc.org. Also, visit http://www.okhistory.org/shpo/conference.htm and read the conference blog at https://okpreservationconference.wordpress.com.

 

MODERN ARCHITECTURE AND INTERNATIONAL PRESERVATION FEATURED AT BARTLESVILLE CONFERENCE

With Modern architecture and international preservation issues featured in Tradition and Transition: Oklahoma’s 27th Annual Statewide Preservation Conference (June 3-5, Bartlesville), a January 2015 announcement by the U. S. Department of the Interior came at the perfect time. DOI Secretary Jewell announced that the United States is nominating “Key Works of Modern Architecture” by Frank Lloyd Wright to the World Heritage List. The group consists of ten buildings from seven states, including Bartlesville’s Price tower. The UNESCO World Heritage Committee will consider the nomination in the summer of 2016. If approved by the committee, the thematic group will become the twenty-third United States WHL inscription.

On Wednesday, June 3, George C. Papagiannis, External Relations and Information, UNESCO, will highlight the work of the international organization and the importance of the WHL in UNESCO, the U.S. and World Heritage. George handles external relations for UNESCO in the United States, raising awareness and advocating for the organization, as well as providing a point of contact to the U.S. Government, civil society organizations and other interested parties working on issues of interest to UNESCO, including the protection of cultural and natural sites around the globe and the designation of World Heritage Sites (WHS).

 

Before assuming his assignment in the U.S. in the spring of 2012, he was the officer-in-charge of the UNESCO’s Iraq Office in Baghdad. Among his efforts, George emphasized the role of women in new media, supported initiatives to protect journalists and led two cultural assessment missions in Iraq, evaluating the Kirkuk Citadel and sites in the holy city of Najaf, which were under consideration for the Iraq World Heritage Tentative List. Prior to joining UNESCO in 2007, he had a distinguished journalism career.

Then, Valerie Hauser, Director, Office of Native American Affairs, Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, will discuss the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. She advises ACHP leadership on policy matters and historic preservation issues affecting Indian Tribes and Native Hawaiian organizations and provides technical expertise to federal agencies regarding tribal and Native Hawaiian consultation. Valerie also represents the ACHP on government-wide initiatives involving indigenous issues. Before joining the ACHP in 1989, she served as Director of Archeology at an environmental education center in New York City. She received her Master of Arts in Anthropology from New York University.


The closing plenary session (Friday, June 5) will feature Tim Samuelson, Cultural Historian, City of Chicago, Cultural Affairs & Special Events. Tim is an authority on the works of Frank Lloyd Wright and Bruce Goff, as well as other Modern style buildings. He will present “Thinking in Three Dimensions.”

Tim has been instrumental in celebrating and protecting Chicago’s past for more than twenty-five years. He is highly regarded for his stewardship of the cultural and architectural history of the city at the Commission on Chicago Landmarks and the Chicago Historical Society. But Tim’s work on behalf of Chicago’s cultural treasures does not stop at his office door. He volunteered his time to work on the restoration of such landmark structures as Union Station, Chess Records, and the Pilgrim Baptist Church. He led the fight to save historic Bronzeville in the 1970’s and pushed for its landmark designation. He continues to work with the Landmark Commission as an advocate for the preservation of buildings that represent diverse aspects of the city’s cultural history. He possesses a wealth of knowledge about Chicago’s neighborhoods the people, the stores, the factories, the labor history. He shares this history by presenting Chicago Neighborhood Tours and by organizing exhibitions that portray subjects relating to popular culture and architecture in an accessible way. As he says, the goal is to get people excited about history especially those who never imagined they would be.

Full conference program and registration information will be available in late April. Follow conference developments at http://www.okhistory.org/shpo/conference.htm and

http://www.facebook.com/okshpo; http://www.twitter.com/okshpo

If you may have questions, contact Melvena Heisch, Deputy SHPO (405/522-4484 or mheisch@okhistory.org).

SHPO’s HISTORIC CONTEXT FOR MODERN ARCHITECTURE IN OKLAHOMA

Take a good look around Oklahoma and you will see entire subdivisions and neighborhoods full of similar houses built between the mid-1940s and 1970s. These neighborhoods reflect the architectural styles and forms popular at the time, including minimal traditional, ranch, and split-levels to name a few. Following World War II, many of these houses were built in response to the housing shortage faced across the United States, not just in Oklahoma.

Today, the large numbers of “modern” houses and neighborhood developments present a challenge. These houses and neighborhoods have now reached, or are about to reach, their 50th birthday. This is when preservation professionals and their partners start to evaluate resources for eligibility for listing in the National Register of Historic Places. Yes Virginia, houses from the 1940’s through the 1970’s are now historic!

In anticipation of needed evaluation, the Oklahoma State Historic Preservation Office prepared the following document: Historic Context for Modern Architecture in Oklahoma.  SHPO staff members Lynda Ozan, architectural historian and Allison Archambo, survey coordinator spent two years researching and evaluating resources from the 1940s through the 1970s and developed a methodology for evaluating these resources.  The document establishes a historic context for Oklahoma for residential properties of the postwar era and outlines methodologies for survey and evaluating them for National Register of Historic Places eligibility.  The context is currently available at http://www.okhistory.org/shpo/thematics.htm  Allison and Lynda will discuss the Modern Architecture context at the annual Statewide Preservation Conference in Bartlesville and look forward to the discussion the document stimulates.

NTHP PRESIDENT SPEAKS AT PRESERVATION CONFERENCE

One of the nation’s leading preservationists, Stephanie K. Meeks, President of the National Trust for Historic Preservation will present  “The Future of the Past: Reconceiving Historic Preservation for the 21st Century” in the opening plenary session for Tradition and Transition: Oklahoma’s 27th Annual Statewide Preservation Conference. It will be held June 3-5 in Bartlesville.

MeeksMeeks has been the president and chief executive officer of the NTHP since July 2010. Under her leadership, the organization has developed an ambitious strategic plan designed to refocus direct action on saving imperiled places, engage new audiences in preservation, and increase the organization’s impact by a factor of ten. The NTHP is working to bring a more diverse and younger group of Americans into the preservation movement, and support their efforts in their communities and across the nation.  It has also launched an effort to highlight the critical connection between older buildings and vibrant cities, and spearheaded research reflecting the benefits of historic preservation in today’s urban areas.

Before joining the NTHP, Meeks held several senior executive positions with The Nature Conservancy; served as director of RARE, a U.S.-based conservation group that uses social marketing to address environmental challenges in communities around the world; and currently serves as Vice Chair of the Board of the Potomac Conservancy. She holds a B.A. in English from the University of Colorado and an MBA from George Washington University.

Full conference program and registration information will be available in late April. For more details, contact Melvena Heisch at 405/522-4484 or mheisch@okhistory.org, or visit the SHPO’s website at http://www.okhistory.org/shpo/conference.htm.