MEET THE SPEAKERS

We are pleased to have several special guest speakers from across the country participating in this year’s statewide preservation conference. They include:

Wade Broadhead
Land Use and Preservation Planner
City of Pueblo
Pueblo, Colorado
(CAMP Faculty)
Wade Broadhead is a Current Land Use and Preservation Planner for Pueblo, Colorado, a position he has held for seven years. Prior to his current position Wade obtained his degree from Western State College in Gunnison, Colorado and worked in Cultural Resource Management and Geographic Information Systems. Wade’s interests lie in neighborhood/zoning/planning interface with preservation as well as preservation issues in low income, Right Sizing cities, and neighborhood Modernism, and he has presented at numerous National Trust and regional conferences. Wade spearheaded a seven year Neighborhood Heritage Enhancement program to document all of Pueblo’s older neighborhoods with exquisitely written contexts. That effort won the City and its partners the Colorado Governor’s Award for Historic Preservation in 2013. Wade also serves on the Executive Board of the National Alliance of Preservation Commissions.

Linda Caldwell
Founder & Former Executive Director
Tennessee Overhill Heritage Association
Etowah, Tennessee
(Plenary Session speaker)
Linda Caldwell is the founder and former Executive Director for the Tennessee Overhill Heritage Association, a program that began in 1990 as a pilot project for the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s “Heritage Tourism Initiative.” Today, TOHA is a national model for successful cultural tourism. Its mission is to promote and preserve the natural and cultural resources of McMinn, Monroe, and Polk counties through cultural tourism. Linda has over thirty years experience working in the non-profit sector on cultural tourism, community arts, rural economic development, and preservation. Prior to her work with TOHA, she served for eleven years as Director for the Etowah Arts Commission. In 2001 TOHA formed the Old Line Railroad Coalition to successfully save an 1890 railroad from abandonment. The railroad is now owned by TOHA and Linda serves as the administrator. Most recently Linda managed a project to document the emigration route taken through the Tennessee Overhill by Cherokee citizens who were rounded up in western North Carolina and moved to Fort Cass in Tennessee before immigrating to Indian Territory.

Roxanne Eflin
Owner/Principal
Preservation Planning Associates
Buxton, Maine
(CAMP Faculty)
Roxanne Eflin is Owner/Principal of Preservation Planning Associates. She holds a Bachelors in Public Administration, a Masters in Urban Planning and Historic Preservation and a Certificate in International Tour Management focusing on cultural/heritage resources. She has 30 years experience in historic preservation, downtown revitalization, place- based community development, cultural tourism and nonprofit leadership. Roxanne began her work in historic preservation in Colorado where she was the Main Street Manager in Manitou Springs, one of the original 30 National Main Street Center demonstration cities. She then served as the first Historic Preservation Officer for both Aspen and Pitkin County, and for Central City, a National Historic Landmark district. She relocated to Maine in 1997 to initiate the full-time Executive Director position of Maine Preservation, the statewide nonprofit organization. Under her leadership Maine Preservation grew into a full-service organization with advocacy efforts that helped lead in the passage of Maine’s historic preservation tax credit program and helped bring Main Street to Maine. She is in the process of returning home to Colorado.

Rory Hays
Attorney at Law
Phoenix, Arizona
(CAMP Faculty)
Rory Hays is a sole Practitioner Attorney, specializing in public affairs and administrative law for 19 years. Her practice is active in areas of government regulation, natural resources, environment, criminal justice and health care. Rory is a former Arizona Assistant Attorney General in the Civil Division. She has also served as a caseworker in Phoenix and Washington, D.C. congressional offices serving as liaison with federal and state agencies for constituent problems. Rory holds a B.A. in Political Science from Arizona State University and a Juris doctor degree from Arizona State University School of Law. She is a former member and chair of the City of Phoenix Historic Preservation Commission and Personnel Board and has served on the National Alliance of Preservation Commissions board of directors.

Steve Kline
Regional Historic Preservation & Fine Arts Officer
General Services Administration
Greater Southwest Region
Fort Worth, Texas
(Rehabilitation Roundtable)
Steve Kline holds Bachelors of Architecture from Ohio State University and from Syracuse University and a Master of Architecture, also from Syracuse University. He is the Regional Historic Preservation, Fine Arts, and Art in Architecture Officer for the General Services Administration’s Greater Southwest Region, which includes Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. Steve is based in Fort Worth and administers the region wide preservation program for over sixty federal structures eligible or listed on the National Register of Historic Places in the region; is responsible for regional compliance with the National Historic Preservation Act; and administers Fine Arts and Art in Architecture programs for the region. Before joining GSA, Steve was Historical Architect with the National Park Service in the Denver Regional Office, C&O Canal National Historic Park and NPS’s Washington, DC Heritage Preservation Services. While with the NPS, he worked with the federal rehabilitation Tax Act Program throughout the nation, and worked on the maintenance, preservation and rehabilitation of historic structures in the parks. He presented training sessions on the interpretation of the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation, and preservation/rehabilitation strategies for historic structures. He is a recipient of the Texas Historical Commissions award of excellence in historic architecture for significant contributions to the preservation of Texas’ architectural heritage.

Susan Allen Kline
Independent Historic Preservation Consultant
Fort Worth, Texas
(Landscapes)
Since 1997, Susan Allen Kline has been a historian and preservation consultant in Fort Worth, and she specializes in the preparation of National Register of Historic Places nominations. She received an MA in History from Oklahoma State University. Susan previously was employed as the Architectural Historian/National Register Coordinator for the Oklahoma State Historic Preservation Office. She also worked as a contract historian for the National Historic Landmarks Survey in Washington, D.C. Her work in Fort Worth has sparked a passion for landscape history which tangentially led to an interest in the history of garden clubs (her topic for the conference this year). Susan was the 2009 recipient of the Texas State Historical Association’s Cecilia Steinfeldt Fellowship for Research in the Arts and Material Culture of Texas to conduct research on the landscape architecture firm of Hare and Hare of Kansas City, Missouri at the University of Missouri-Kansas City. In 2012, she received a Citation of Honor from the Texas Society of Architects for her contributions to the field of historic preservation in Texas. Her first book, Fort Worth Parks was released by Arcadia Publishing in 2010.

Anna Mod
Historic Preservation Specialist
SWCA Environmental Consultants
Houston, Texas
(Historic Preservation and Modernism)
Anna Mod is a historic preservation specialist with SWCA Environmental Consultants in Houston. She is the author of Building Modern Houston and a contributing author to Buildings of Texas, vol. 1 as well as articles for Cite and Texas Architect magazines. Her professional practice focuses on Investment Tax Credit applications, Section 106 compliance and historic designations.

Joe Watkins
Supervisory Anthropologist
and Chief, Tribal Relations and American Cultures
National Park Service
Washington, D. C.
(Preservation Oklahoma, Inc.’s Luncheon Speakr)
Joe Watkins, a member of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, received his Bachelors of Arts degree from the University of Oklahoma and a Masters of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy in Anthropology from Southern Methodist University. He has held academic positions at OU, including service as the Director of the Native American Studies Program from 2007-2013, and at the University of New Mexico, governmental positions with the National Park Service and the Bureau of Indian Affairs, and private positions ranging from an archaeological consultant, a museum business manager, and assistant director of a legal services organization. Joe has been intensively involved in anthropology and heritage preservation initiatives at the national level as a member of the Board of Directors of the Society for American Archaeology and the Plains Anthropological Society, as well as in numerous capacities within committee structures of international, national, regional and local organizations. His publications include numerous articles and book chapters on the ethical practice of anthropology and anthropology’s relationships with descendant communities and populations, including American Indians, Australian Aboriginals, New Zealand Maori, and the Japanese Ainu. Additionally, he served as a member of Preservation Oklahoma, Inc.’s board of directors.

Elizabeth Watson
Heritage Strategies LLC
Birchrunville, Pennsylvania
(Heritage tourism Workshops)
Elizabeth Watson has served nonprofit and governmental clients as a consultant and facilitator for more than twenty years. She most enjoys working with others on her passion, preserving environmentally and historically significant places, historic sites, and traditional communities through strategic planning and innovative programs. She has worked on many heritage areas, scenic byways, greenways, and other projects that combine regional planning with community education and resource conservation initiatives. A former nonprofit executive and state official as well as independent planner, she understands the complexities of cross-jurisdictional collaboration, public-private partnership, and multi-level governmental cooperation. She frequently advises nonprofit organizations on enhancing their capabilities to participate in such alliances through strategic planning, board development, fundraising, and civic engagement.
Elizabeth has worked in more than a dozen American national heritage areas to encourage stewardship and greater public access for natural, cultural, scenic, recreational, and historic resources.
She is a co-author of the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s Saving America’s Countryside: A Guide to Rural Conservation (Johns Hopkins University Press, 1997, 2nd ed.). This book, which in 1990 won both the Historic Preservation Book Prize and an Honor Award from the American Society of Landscape Architects, grew out of her experience working for the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s Rural Program to establish a national methodology for caring for rural cultural landscapes. She also co-produced the 1992 award-winning environmental film made for the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, Chesapeake: Living off the Land. Elizabeth holds a B.A. degree in history from Wake Forest University and a master’s degree in regional planning from the Pennsylvania State University.

John Williams
Founding Principal
John Williams I Architect
Snohomish, Washington
(CAMP Faculty)
John Williams is the founding principal of John Williams I Architect. His current responsibilities include project management, coordination, and design for both public and private clients. He works collaboratively on project teams rehabilitating historically significant resources, producing planning studies, and conducting preservation workshops. President Bush appointed John to the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation. He was appointed by Governor Locke to the Washington State Advisory Council on Historic Preservation and reappointed by Governor Gregoire as its Chairman. He has served as Vice President of Preservation Action and enjoyed serving as Chairman of the National Alliance of Preservation Commissions. He was the Chair of the Pike Place Market Historical Commission, Chair of the Oysterville Design Review Board, and a past member of the King County Landmarks Commission.
Joining our out-of-state guests are over fourty Oklahoma preservation professionals and leaders. Following are short bios for each of them.

Susan Atkinson
Historic Preservation Officer
Planning Department
City of Norman
Norman, Oklahoma
Susan Owen Atkinson is from Salisbury, North Carolina and has lived in old houses all her life. She has a Master’s Degree in Urban Planning from the University of Kansas. She is a member of the American Institute of Certified Planners (AICP) and the National Association of Preservation Commissions. She also serves on the Board of Directors of Preservation Oklahoma, Inc. Since 2005, Susan has been the Historic Preservation Officer for the City of Norman. Prior to joining the staff, she served on Norman’s Historic District Commission for three years. She has lived in Norman’s Chautauqua Historic District since 2002.

Josh Barrett
115 E 5th LLC
Tulsa, Oklahoma
Joshua A. Barrett and his wife Amanda currently manage two companies together. Vesta Properties, LLC is a residential property management company, and 115 E. 5th LLC is redeveloping the Tulsa Club Building. Josh moved to Tulsa in 2001 from Shawnee after serving in the US Navy and working for the family petroleum business. Josh was also previously involved in the development of Vicksburg Riverwalk Casino in Vicksburg, Mississippi.

Robert Bartlett
ODOT Cultural Resources Program
Oklahoma Archeological Survey
Norman, Oklahoma
Robert Bartlett holds a BA and an MA in Anthropology from the University of Oklahoma. A lifelong Oklahoman and archeologist, he is employed with the Oklahoma Department of Transportation (ODOT) Cultural Resources Program and has worked for the program since 1993. Working for ODOT, has provided Robert the opportunity to work on many archeological sites representing both the historic and prehistoric time periods across the State.

Leland C. Bement
Research Archeologist
Oklahoma Archeological Survey
Norman, Oklahoma
Leland Bement holds a Ph.D. from the University of Texas. He is a research archeologist with the Oklahoma Archeological Survey, and his specializations include Palaeoindians, bison kills, and the Southern Plains.

Robert L. Brooks
State Archeologist
Oklahoma Archeological Survey
Norman, Oklahoma
Robert L. Brooks is currently Director and State Archaeologist, Oklahoma Archeological Survey, University of Oklahoma. He has been with the Archeological Survey for the past 30 years. Bob obtained his B.A. from Wright State University in Ohio, his masters from the University of Arkansas, and his Ph.D. from the University of Kentucky. He currently oversees the preservation of Oklahoma’s prehistoric and early historic Native American cultural heritage, conducts research on Oklahoma archaeological history, and teaches on a part-time basis in the Department of Anthropology. Research interests include the Southern Plains and Southeastern U.S., prehistoric agriculture, cultural landscapes, and resource management. Bob’s current work includes an archaeological study of Caddoan mound building people in central Oklahoma, an extensive collection of artifacts from Lake Hudson, and the study of individuals who were critical in the developmental history of Oklahoma archaeology. Some recent works include Southern Plains Villagers (with Robert E. Bell) in the Handbook of North American Indians: The Plains and From Mounds to Mammoths: A Fieldguide to Oklahoma Prehistory (with Claudette Gilbert), Arkansas River Basin Caddoan in Central Oklahoma (Plains Anthropologist), and Humans on the Landscape (Centennial Historical Atlas of Oklahoma).

Kent Buehler
Research Archeologist
Oklahoma Archeological Survey
Norman, Oklahoma
Kent Buehler is completing his doctorate degree at the University of Oklahoma. He is a research archeologist with the Oklahoma Archeological Survey, and his specializations include collections management, forensic archeology, and bison kills.

Terry Cline
Property Owner
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
(Biographical sketch not yet available.)

Richard Drass
Research Archeologist,
Oklahoma Archeological Survey
Norman, Oklahoma
Richard Drass holds a Ph.D. from the University of Oklahoma, and he is a research archeologist with the Oklahoma Archeological Survey. His specializations include Plains Villagers, ethno-botany, historic Wichita, and the Southern Plains.

Marjorie Duncan
Archeologist
Oklahoma Archeological Survey
Norman, Oklahoma
Marjorie Duncan received her Ph.D. from the University of Oklahoma, and she is an archeologist with the Oklahoma Archeological Survey. Her specializations include Hunters & Gatherers, cultural resource management, and the Southern Plains.

Chris Fleming
Midtown Renaissance
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Chris Fleming, from Moore, has served as Executive Vice President of REHCO, LLC since 2006. He is a partner in an array of investments including real estate, private equity, and oil & gas. The most visible of these business ventures is Midtown Renaissance, a real estate company engaged in the redevelopment of a half-million square feet of mixed-use properties, 10 historic tax credit projects, and 500,000+ square feet of developable land in the Midtown District of Oklahoma City.

Ron Frantz
Associate Professor and
Director of Great Plains Studios, Institute for Quality Communities
College of Architecture
The University of Oklahoma
Norman, Oklahoma
Ron Frantz is a licensed architect who specializes in historic preservation, Main Street revitalization, neighborhood revitalization, and all types of community-based, grassroots design programs. With two degrees from The Tulane University of Louisiana, his work experience includes founding two architecture firms, working in private sector firms, staffing a local non-profit organization, and working for a state agency as well as holding staff and faculty positions at a private college.
Currently, Ron is an Associate Professor with the Architecture division, and is Director of Great Plains Studios, a part of the Institute for Quality Communities in the University of Oklahoma’s college of Architecture.

Erinn Gavaghan
Executive Director
Norman Arts Council
Norman, Oklahoma
Erinn Gavaghan is an art historian and arts administrator currently living in Oklahoma City. In 2010 she graduated from Webster University in St. Louis with an MA in Art History. She specializes in sixteenth and seventeenth century European art and architecture as well as socially engaged contemporary art. Erinn is the Executive Director for the Norman Arts Council, as well as an adjunct professor with the University of Oklahoma and Oklahoma City Community College. She is also an active volunteer in the central Oklahoma arts community. She currently serves on the board of the Cultural Development Corporation of Central Oklahoma, the Norman Public Arts Board, and the Downtown Merchants Board for Norman. She works with state and local governments and arts agencies to advise and advocate on issues related to artists, arts organizations, and public funding for the arts. Her current interests, research, and projects revolve around the arts’ role in economic development and quality of life in communities.

Charles W. Graham
Dean
College of Architecture
University of Oklahoma
Norman, Oklahoma
Charles Graham is an architect, interior designer, construction scientist and planner. He has a Bachelor of Architecture from Texas Tech University, a Master’s in Urban Studies from the University of Texas at San Antonio, and a Ph.D. in Urban and Regional Science from Texas A&M University. He taught and was an administrator at Texas A&M University, where he worked for 25 years, before becoming the Dean of the College of Architecture at the University of Oklahoma in 2008. He arrived in time to oversee the $33 million remodeling of Gould Hall at OU, which the five divisions of architecture, interior design, construction science, landscape architecture, and regional and city planning now occupy. He has also been working on a history of the College which is scheduled for publication in spring 2014.

Scott Hammerstedt
Archeologist
Oklahoma Archeological Survey
Norman, Oklahoma
Scott Hammerstedt received his Ph.D. from Penn State University. He is a research archeologist with the Oklahoma Archeological Survey and specializes in Mississippian societies, remote sensing, and experimental archeology.

John D. Hartley
Environmental Program Manager
FHWA – Oklahoma Division
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
John Hartley is a native of Stillwater, Oklahoma, and has been active in historic preservation since the early 1970’s. He received his MA in archaeology from the University of Oklahoma in 1974. While at OU he worked for and later directed the Oklahoma River Basin Survey program at the University, undertaking archaeological excavations for a variety of US Army Corps of Engineers reservoir projects in Oklahoma. In 1977-78, while pursuing additional graduate work at Tulane University, he managed the University’s contract archaeology program. While in Louisiana he directed a survey and archival review project of old Fort St. Phillips in the Mississippi Delta and directed the excavation of a mid-19th Century Anglo-American farmstead. From the late 1970s through the mid-1980s he worked as a private cultural resources consultant in Virginia and Colorado, and worked in a number of states in the desert west, Rocky Mountains, Great Plains, and Mid-Atlantic region. In 1985, he returned to Oklahoma as the Department Archaeologist of the Oklahoma Department of Transportation. He was instrumental in completion of Oklahoma’s first historic bridge survey, and worked with ODOT to expand and diversify the ODOT Cultural Resources Program. In 2006, he retired from ODOT and took his current position with the Federal Highway Administration-Oklahoma Division as Environmental Program Manager.

Andre L. Head
Founder/CEO
The Coltrane Group/History in Progress
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Andre’ Head brings over thirty years of managerial experience to his quest for community preservation and family research. Having served as Safety Manager at both Experience Music Project and Chateau Ste Michelle, Andre’ taught Health and Safety courses at Central State University while devoting his first career to the Fire Service in his native Oklahoma. A retired Fire Chief, Andre’ previously served as a Fire Marshal, an Arson Investigator, and a Life Safety Instructor prior to moving to Washington state.
Most recently, Andre’ served Seattle and the Washington area as a Federal Marshal, and with his dog, Misha, as a Certified Explosives Detection Canine Team. An avid genealogist, Andre’ has devoted years of research to family heritage, having discovered and collected records, anecdotes, and other data on six-plus generations of his own family. Drawn to one of his most recent projects through research on cemeteries of Oklahoma-born family descendants, he produced and directed the first in a series of documentaries on The Black Towns of Oklahoma, a project about which he is extremely passionate. He is the Founder and CEO of The Coltrane Group and History In Progress. Heavily involved in the revitalization and economic development of Black towns, The Coltrane Group has partnered with the town of Boley in her renewal efforts, having recently completed an Assessment of the Boley Public Library for the National Park Service, and a museum exhibit, ‘Colored Memories’, reflecting the cultural and early entrepreneurial richness of ‘The Crown Jewel’. His conference presentation will focus on the progress made in The Coltrane Group’s quest to assist The Historic Black Towns of Oklahoma in preserving their rich legacy. He is eager to share with you the rich history and the continued progress of The All-Black Towns of Oklahoma.

Jessilyn Head
Chief Operating Officer
The Coltrane Group/History in Progress
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Bringing more than thirty years of experience to her current role as Chief Operating Officer of The Coltrane Group, Jessilyn A. Head has worked extensively in both the public and private sector. Having served as Special Assistant to The Governor in Charge of Intergovernmental Relations in the State of Washington, Jessilyn previously held posts as Executive Director of Adams Career Associates; Executive Director of a Human Services Agency in Portland; Director of Human Resources with Honeywell Aerospace; Deputy Director with Yakima Valley Opportunities Industrialization Center; Director of Equal Opportunity at Pittsburg State University; and began her professional career as Development Engineer with Honeywell Aerospace. Serving on numerous Boards and Commissions including United Way of King County, Young Women’s Christian Association, Cultural Pursuits, Operational Emergency Center, Girl Scouts of America, and The Governor’s Commission on Employment. She works closely with Andre in efforts to preserve the heritage of Oklahoma’s All-Black towns. They are now settling into their new home in Oklahoma City and are pleased to be “back in the state.”

Arn Henderson
Professor Emeritus
College of Architecture
University of Oklahoma
Norman, Oklahoma
Arn Henderson is Professor Emeritus of Architecture at the University of Oklahoma and a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects. His research has focused on Oklahoma architecture, vernacular architecture of the Southern Plains and the architectural expression of Bruce Goff. He is currently serving as the architectural historian on the Oklahoma Historic Preservation Review Committee, the entity appointed by the Governor to advise the State Historic Preservation Officer on nominations to the National Register of Historic Places.

David Hornbeek
Hornbeek Blatt Architects, P.C.
Edmond, Oklahoma
David Hornbeek graduated from John Marshall High School in 1972. He attended the University of Oklahoma graduating with a Bachelor of Science in Environmental Design, “with Distinction”, in 1976, and continued with a Bachelor of Architecture, “with Distinction”. In 1978 he received the AIA School “Gold Medal” and a Master of Architecture from the University of Oklahoma. He is a NCARB Certificate Holder with a license currently in Texas. He has been in business since 1981. His territories have expanded from doing business first in Oklahoma to performing architecture nationally in Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri, Alabama, Texas, California, Maryland, Kansas, and Hawaii; and also internationally in Norway, Israel, Japan, Malaysia and Singapore. Currently Hornbeek Blatt Architects, P.C. is an architectural practice providing consulting services from the initial conceptual design to the actual construction. As principal and head designer, his firm is responsible for the design of the UCO Jazz Lab, the Oklahoma City Community Foundation (a commission that was secured by winning a design competition with 6 selected firms), the Edmond Public Service Center, the “M.A.C.” – Recreation and Senior Center at Mitch Park, the Lazy E Arena, the UCO Stadium Expansion, Perimeter Tech Data Center, and the Oklahoma Dental Association State Office Building. Hornbeek Blatt Architects currently heads a design team of 11 internationally recognized consultants as prime architects for the proposed American Indian Cultural Center and Museum on the Oklahoma River.
In 1983-89 he was a principal of Blair Hornbeek Architects; from 1989-96, he was principal of Blair Hornbeek Larsson Architects; from 1996-98, he was principal of Hornbeek Larsson Hinchey Architects; from 1998-2002, he was principal of Hornbeek Larsson Blatt Architects; and from 2002 to the present he has been a principal for Hornbeek Blatt Architects. Gov. Henry Bellmon appointed David to the Board of Governors of Licensed Architects in 1986, and Governor Mary Fallin recently reappointed him to the board. In 2006, his firm was the recipient of an “Honor Award” (Next/LA category) at the National AIA convention in Los Angeles for their design of the American Indian Cultural Center. Currently, Hornbeek Blatt has been named Executive Architect on the proposed 21c Hotel project that will transform the Fred Jones Remanufacturing facility (initially built by Henry Ford as a manufacturing plant for Model-Ts in 1914) located at 900 West Main in downtown Oklahoma City into a $30 million hotel and museum for the 21c Hotel Corporation located in Louisville, KY.

Mike Kertok
Architect
Norman, Oklahoma
Mike Kertok was educated at the University of Oklahoma, graduating with a Master of Architecture degree in 1982. He learned his trade while employed by several large architecture firms, gaining a wide variety of experience and increasing responsibilities, and established his own firm in 1999, where he specializes in historic preservation and renovation projects. Mike has received numerous design awards throughout his career, including awards from the American Society of Interior Designers and the Oklahoma State Historic Preservation Office. He has coordinated with the State Historic Preservation Office on numerous projects and is thoroughly familiar with the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation. Significant historic preservation projects include: Trinity Episcopal Church, Guthrie, OK (1890, 1913); Nuway Laundry and Cleaners, Oklahoma City, OK (1918, 1928, 1934, 1940, 1953); Chickasha Hotel, Chickasha, OK (1902, 1909, 1910, 1917, 1922, 1929); Odor-Robison Round Barn, Arcadia, OK (1898); Overholser Mansion, Oklahoma City, OK(1903), the Gold Dome (Citizen’s State Bank), Oklahoma City, OK (1958); Okmulgee Colored Hospital, Okmulgee, OK (1922); the Rock Café, Stroud, OK(1939); Firestone Station, Bristow, OK (1930); Independent Oil & Gas Company Station, Route 66, Baxter Springs, KS (1930); Phillips 66 Station, Route 66, Cuba, MO (1932); Phillips 66 Station, Route 66, Tulsa, OK (1930); Cities Service Station, Route 66, Tulsa, OK (c. 1950); Murray-Lindsay Mansion, Erin Springs, OK (1879 / 1902); Douthit Building, Baxter Springs, KS (1870 / 1926);and Wheelock Academy, Millerton, OK (1884 – 1930’s).

Omar M. Khoury
Founder/Director
MODA Architecture
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Omar M. Khoury, NCARB, LEED® AP is Founder/Director of MODA Architecture. Omar is passionate about sustainable design and rehabilitating old buildings for new uses. With a bachelor of architecture from Oklahoma State University, he has practiced architecture in Oklahoma for over 20 years. His award winning projects include the Oklahoma City Civic Center Music Hall, the Oklahoma City Museum of Art, and the OKC Community Foundation Headquarters. As the architect for the rehabilitation of Calvary Baptist Church, Omar’s focus was on transforming an empty building back into a useful space. The sanctuary of the historic church was restored and the rest of the building converted into a law office. One of the challenges was creating office spaces around the perimeter of the building, while still preserving the view of the stained glass windows from the centrally located sanctuary. Based in Oklahoma City, Omar founded MODA Architecture in 2009 with a passion to pull together the right team, to create the right design, for each client. His commitment is to build a team of professionals clients can trust, made up of people they will enjoy working with.

Mark Larson
Mark Larson Development
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Mark Larson is a real estate developer focused on rehabilitation of historic buildings. He attended the University of Oklahoma where he studied criminal justice and law. Then, he operated several successful businesses in Oklahoma City and Tulsa in addition to participating in various real estate ventures. For the past eight years Mark has concentrated on real estate development, particularly in the use of the historic rehabilitation tax credits. He began historic tax credit development in Richmond, Virginia, where he completed five projects. He plans to utilize the knowledge and experience gained in Virginia to preserve historic buildings in Oklahoma. He is currently rehabilitating the historic Chevrolet Dealership in Tulsa for 83 units, scheduled for completion in December 2014. Future projects include development of the original Jane Phillips Memorial Hospital in Bartlesville, and the recently acquired Haskell Building in Muskogee.

David W. Levy
David Ross Boyd Professor of History, Emeritus
Department of History
University of Oklahoma
Norman, Oklahoma
David W. Levy is David Ross Boyd Professor of American History, Emeritus, at the University of Oklahoma, where he has taught since 1967. He earned a B.A. from the University of Illinois, an M.A. from the University of Chicago, and a PhD from the University of Wisconsin. He has earned the Regents Award for Superior Teaching, the AMOCO Teaching Award, and the Student Association award for the best teacher on campus. He was named the Sam K. Viersen Presidential Professor, 1999-2003, and the Irene and Julian Rothbaum Professor of Modern American History, from 2003 until his retirement in 2006. His primary research interests are in American intellectual and constitutional history. He is the co-editor of seven volumes of the letters of Supreme Court justice, Louis D. Brandeis. In addition, he has published five other books with Princeton University Press, Johns Hopkins University Press, the University of Oklahoma Press, and Penguin Books. He has written numerous articles in scholarly, popular, and legal journals and many encyclopedia entries and reviews. In 2010 he published a biography of the American writer, Mark Twain, in the Prentice Hall series of American biographies. But his main scholarly interest in recent years has been the history of the University of Oklahoma. The first volume, covering the period until the start of World War One, was published in 2006; the second volume, which will carry the story up to around 1950, will appear later this year. In this connection, he has published twenty articles in The Sooner Magazine exploring particular aspects of the University’s history.

Larry B. Lucas
Architect
Oklahoma Main Street Center
Oklahoma Department of Commerce
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Larry Lucas is the staff architect for the Oklahoma Main Street Center. Larry grew up on a historic Oklahoma Main Street, where his family rehabilitated a building for the family business. He has a real passion for historic preservation, environmental stewardship and the Main Street Approach. He is a graduate of the University of Oklahoma, with a Bachelor of Architecture and is a licensed Architect in the State of Oklahoma. He is a LEED Accredited Professional (LEED AP O&M), a member of the United States Green Building Council, and a member of the American Institute of Architects.

Joshua Lunsford
Community Arts Director
Oklahoma Arts Council
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Joshua Lunsford (Community Arts Director) joined the Council in 2012. He holds a Master of Arts in Journalism and Mass Communications from the University of Oklahoma with a focus on nonprofit marketing and management. He also holds a Bachelor of Arts in Advertising from OU. Prior to joining the Oklahoma Arts Council, Josh was the Associate Director for the Norman Arts Council and gallery manager of MAINSITE Contemporary Art in Norman. As Community Arts Director, he oversees the Community Arts Programs, the Oklahoma Performing Artist Roster, and the ONEAL Network.

Umit Hope Mander
Associate Director
Institute for Quality Communities
College of Architecture
University of Oklahoma
Norman, Oklahoma
Umit Hope Mander is the Associate Director of the Institute for Quality Communities. She received her Bachelor of Science degree in Environmental Design and Master of Regional and City Planning from the University of Oklahoma while working for the University. Until rejoining the University of Oklahoma in 2008, she worked as a City Planner for the City of Newcastle from 2006 – 2008 where she was involved in all aspects of comprehensive land planning.
In her position with the IQC Hope develops and maintains relations with Oklahoma communities and identifies communities who can benefit from IQC services. Her main focus is working with small to medium size towns and cities.

Catherine Montgomery
President and Founder
Preservation & Design Studio
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Preservation and Design Studio, an architecture and interiors firm specializing in Historic Preservation, was founded by Catherine Montgomery AIA after nearly 25 years in public service where she honed her skills and knowledge of Architecture, Interiors and Historic Preservation. The Studio’s projects include varied building types, for example Class A office, multi-family residential and retail. The firm offers a full range of design services, with or without the historic preservation component, and often works as a special consultant to the owner/developer or as a consultant to the Architect team. The P and D Studio also offers services that include existing building surveys, historic structures reports, HABS/HAER documentation, historic architectural surveys, and National Register nominations. The firm currently has several projects, in various stages of design or construction, totaling 300,000 square feet and valued at $40 million. Most P and D Studio projects meet the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards and Guidelines for the treatment of Historic Properties (Preservation, Rehabilitation, Restoration or Reconstruction) either by choice or requirement. Before focusing on the P and D Studio, Catherine’s public service career includes positions at the University of Maryland, the Oklahoma State Historic Preservation Office, the Oklahoma Historical Society and most recently the City of Oklahoma City. She has consulted on hundreds of Oklahoma Buildings totaling over 250 million dollars in Section 106 compliance and certified preservation tax incentives projects including the Skirvin Hilton Hotel. Catherine is a registered architect and interior designer and serves on the boards for the Oklahoma chapter of the American Institute of Architects and the Professional Advisory Board of the OU School of Architecture. She was born and raised at the foot of Pikes Peak in Colorado Springs and graduated from the School of Architecture at the University of Kansas.

Lynda Ozan
Architectural Historian
State Historic Preservation Office
Oklahoma Historical Society
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Lynda Ozan is the Architectural Historian and National Register Program Coordinator for the Oklahoma State Historic Preservation Office. An Ohio native, Lynda has degrees in both history and historic preservation; and brings over 15 years of preservation experience to the State of Oklahoma. Lynda’s research interests span architectural and cultural history and colonial America. She has conducted research in the area of westward expansion settlement patterns; indentured servitude; and modern architectural styles. Her research contributes to our understanding of the relationships between people and place, as well as the character of different places. She is the author of many National Register of Historic Places nominations, journal articles and most recently is developing a context for post WWII housing from 1946-1976 in Oklahoma.

Christopher A. Price
Director
Honey Springs Battlefield
Oklahoma Historical Society
Checotah, Oklahoma
Christopher Price has been interested in preservation since he started collecting baseball cards as a boy. He spent hours making sure each card was accounted for and in mint condition. This enjoyment of collecting carried over in to the Boy Scouts of America when he accumulated enough badges to be awarded his Eagle Scout in 1996.
During this time he also started restoring classic cars, a hobby that taught him a lot about
preservation and even more about mechanics. Later in life he became a professional Boy Scout and was the District Executive for the Chisholm Trail District. During this time he learned about the cultural resources of his hometown and the surrounding area. He found himself visiting the Historical Societies and researching the cultural fabric of the community. This research led to developing partnerships and presenting briefings, lectures, and speaking engagements for a variety of groups and organizations. He enjoyed attending the University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma and graduated with two Bachelor’s degrees one in Political Science and the other in History. He furthered his academic studies by attending the University of Oklahoma and graduated with a Masters of Arts in Museum Studies. Through this experience he deepened his understanding of cultural resource management and helped to foster a sense of stewardship in preserving history. When exploring career options Christopher combined his outdoor activities and experience with the Boy Scouts of America with his educational background in historic preservation and began his career with the National Park Service at Grand Canyon National Park as a Museum Technician, where he gained valuable experience with Museum Management issues such as inventory, storage, and preservation. His professional endeavors also included Cultural Resource Management issues that involve Archeology, Cultural Landscapes, Ethnology, and Historic Structures.
Career advancements with the National Park Service have led him to the Outer Banks of North Carolina where he worked in the Cultural Resources Division which includes Cape Hatteras National Seashore, Fort Raleigh National Historic Site and the Wright Brothers National Memorial. Christopher returned to his home state of Oklahoma as the Director of Honey Springs Battlefield, a Civil War site operated by the Oklahoma Historical Society.

Jacquelyn Reese
Librarian
Western History Collections
University of Oklahoma Libraries
Norman, Oklahoma
Jacquelyn Reese serves as the Western History Collections Librarian and Assistant Professor of Bibliography at the University of Oklahoma Libraries. Jackie received a Bachelor of Arts degree in history from Pittsburg State University in Pittsburg, Kansas, in 2007 and a Master of Library and Information Studies degree from the University of Oklahoma School of Library and Information Studies in 2009. As the Western History Collections librarian, Jackie provides instruction on using Collections resources, reference assistance onsite and virtually, and supervision of the Photographic Archives and Library Division. Jackie recently published the second edition of Guide to Photographs in the Western History Collections of the University of Oklahoma with Kristina L. Southwell through the University of Oklahoma Press, has published several articles relating to digital collections accessibility, and is currently working on University of Oklahoma Path to Excellence: 1890-2015, a photographic history of the University of Oklahoma to be published by the University of Oklahoma Press for the university’s 125th anniversary.

Amanda Regnier
Archeologist
Oklahoma Archeological Survey
Norman, Oklahoma
Amanda Regnier holds a Ph.D. from the University of Alabama, and she is a research archeologist with the Oklahoma Archeological Survey. Her specializations include Mississippian societies, ceramics, and the historic period.
Mark D.G. Sanders
Member/Manager
Preservation Strategies, LLC
Tulsa, Oklahoma
Mark Sanders is the Member-Manager of Preservation Strategies, LLC – the owner of the McGregor House. Mark is also a bankruptcy and reorganization lawyer at the firm of Gable Gotwals in Tulsa, where he is a shareholder. In addition, he serves as an adjunct faculty member at the University of Tulsa School of Law (teaching Creditors’ Rights & Bankruptcy). Mark is a graduate of Occidental College and the Columbia University School of Law. A fourth-generation Tulsan (on both sides of his family), Mark succumbed to a “homing instinct” and returned to Oklahoma in 2009, after a 30-year sojourn through California, New York, Missouri and Connecticut.
Mark has a fascination with the history of Oklahoma, and Tulsa specifically. He also has a passion for preserving the structural evidence of that history. Mark and his family currently live within the Maple Ridge National Register District and the North Maple Ridge Historic Preservation District.

Cynthia Savage
Architectural Historian
Architectural Resources and Community
Heritage (A.R.C.H.) Consulting
Pocasset, Oklahoma
Involved in Oklahoma’s historic preservation community for over twenty years, Cindy Savage has researched and written about a variety of 1930s New Deal programs and resources. This includes PWA courthouses, WPA schools, CCC parks, CWA dams and FERA community projects. From Ardmore to Warwick, almost a quarter of Cindy’s 97 National Register nominations have dealt with New Deal properties. Two of her seven articles published in The Chronicles of Oklahoma pertain to New Deal programs and buildings. With a Bachelor of Arts in History from Colorado State University and a Master of Arts in Applied History from Oklahoma State University, Cindy has operated an independent preservation consulting firm for almost sixteen years. Previous to this, she worked for the Oklahoma State Historic Preservation Office.

Fred Schmidt
Frankfurt Short Bruza Associates
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Fred Schmidt, FAIA is a Principal in the firm of Frankfurt Short Bruza Associates architects engineers planners with 40 years of experience providing leadership in the design industry. He is responsible for corporate initiatives through business development, client management, community outreach and the FSB Associate’s Program. Fred has been involved in a number of historic preservation projects throughout his career, served as Chief Architect for the State Capitol Dome project and is currently Project Principal for the repurposing of the historic Oklahoma City Central High School. He sees his primary role as a guide for his clients, helping them bring their visions and goals into reality. He is adept at stewarding multiple stakeholders through complex decisions that arise during the planning, design and construction process and at leading clients to achieve high quality design solutions. Fred was inducted into the College of Fellows of the American Institute of Architects for his accomplishments in community and education programs. Fred is past President of the AIA/Central Oklahoma Chapter, past Board Member of AIA/Oklahoma Chapter, past Chair of the National AIA Education Committee and current Chair of the Professional Advisory Board of the Division of Architecture of the OU College of Architecture. He is an alumnus of Leadership OKC class XXII and Leadership Oklahoma class XXI.

Harry Simms
Historic Preservation Architect
State Historic Preservation Office
Oklahoma Historical Society
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Harry Simms has worked as a licensed professional architect for the past thirty years. In the private sector Harry has worked on both new and historic preservation projects in the states of Texas, Oklahoma, Illinois, and New York. In particular, the historic rehabilitations of St. Paul’s Cathedral of Oklahoma City and Old North Tower Normal School in Edmond, have been projects formative to Harry’s practical approach to preservation planning and design. His experience extends the full range of historic structures’ stewardship as he has worked for the State of Oklahoma, the Field Artillery Center Fort Sill, and as a defense contractor for Tinker Air Force Base, in addition to his working for firms in private practice. Harry received the degrees of Bachelor of Architecture from the University of Oklahoma in 1982 and Master of Architecture from the University of Illinois at Chicago in 1988. Since returning to the post of Historic Preservation Architect for the Oklahoma SHPO in 2007, Harry has served as Oklahoma’s coordinator for the National Park Service/Technical Preservation Services Certified Rehabilitation Application program.

Joel Slaughter
Phillips Slaughter Rose, Inc.
Jenks, Oklahoma
Joel Slaughter is a graduate of Oklahoma State University and holds a Master’s of Architecture degree and a Bachelor’s degree in Architectural Studies. He is a managing partner of Phillips Slaughter Rose, Inc. a Tulsa based architectural, engineering and construction management firm. Over the last few years Joel and his company have been involved with the rehabilitation of numerous buildings in the revitalized Tulsa downtown area. Four of those projects qualified for the federal tax incentives program. Projects of note include; the McFarlin Building Rehabilitation; the PPG Warehouse Rehabilitation (aka Detroit Lofts); the Mayo Hotel and Lofts Rehabilitation; Tulsa Old City Hall and Civic Plaza Rehabilitation; and the Vandever Building and Lofts Rehabilitation. Along with the redevelopment of historic buildings Joel and his partners are engaged in the development of a 22-acre urban center in Jenks. This new development is designed as an extension of the existing Jenks Main Street and is meant to complement the urban fabric of the historic downtown. Joel loves history and enjoys working to preserve that history through rehabilitation of significant architecture.

John Snyder
Brickhugger LLC
Tulsa, Oklahoma
John Snyder is Chairman and CEO of Sustainable Design Builders, and he holds a B.S. in Building Construction from Texas A&M University. He is also a member of the Tulsa Preservation Commission. John has been a builder and developer for 35 years completing $2 billion worth of construction in the southwest United States. In addition to new construction, he and his wife Tori have pioneered the revitalization of downtown Tulsa, renovating and preserving historic properties totaling $100 million. They currently own and operate Tulsa’s celebrated Mayo Hotel. In addition to the Mayo Hotel, John and his family through their development company Brickhugger, have brought back to useful life the McFarlin Building, Detroit Lofts and Tulsa Old City Hall-Aloft Hotel. Brickhugger’s current projects include Tulsa’s Vandever Lofts, YMCA Lofts, and Best Western Plus, as well as Pawhuska’s Triangle Building.

Ryan L. Spring
GIS/GPS Specialist
Historic Preservation Department
Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma
Durant, Oklahoma
Ryan Spring is the GIS/GPS Specialist for the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma Historic Preservation Department. He was hired by the Tribe after receiving his Bachelor’s Degree in Anthropology from the University of Arkansas in fall of 2011. His job duties include using GIS (Geographic Information System) and GPS (Global Positioning System) technology to aid in protecting sites important to Choctaw people, creating cultural maps for education, and conducting Choctaw cultural presentations, research, and advisement. Ryan also enjoys playing Choctaw stickball for the Choctaw Nation’s Stickball Team as well as helping coach stickball to youth and adults in his community.

Scott Sundermeyer
Director
ODOT Cultural Resources Program
Oklahoma Archeological Survey
Norman, Oklahoma
Scott Sundermeyer is the Director for the Oklahoma Department of Transportation’s Cultural Resources Program where his responsibilities include assisting the Department in regulatory compliance with state and federal cultural resources laws. He has 18 years of experience in cultural resources practices and has worked on projects in Wyoming, North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona. Scott completed his Master’s degree thesis on a protohistoric Wichita village in central Kansas in which he addressed economic specialization through an analysis of artifacts recovered from 21 excavated storage pits.

HISTORIC PRESERVATION ABCs Oklahoma’s 26th Annual Statewide Preservation Conference

The Oklahoma Historical Society, State Historic Preservation Office invites you to attend Historic Preservation ABCs: Oklahoma’s 26th Annual Statewide Preservation Conference, June 4-6, 2014, in Norman, with most events on the University of Oklahoma campus. Conference registration and sessions will be held in Gould Hall, 830 Van Vleet Oval, home of the OU College of Architecture. Registration is now open at http://iqc.ou.edu/events/preservation. The basic registration fee is $40.00 per person, if you register by May 28.

Fifty-four Oklahoma preservation leaders and guest speakers from across the country will participate in the conference which offers three concurrent tracks of sessions and several special events. A few highlights are described below.

Commission Assistance Mentoring Program (CAMP) is an intensive one-and-a-half-day training opportunity for design review commission members, local government staff, and others. It is a program of the National Alliance of Preservation Commissions (NAPC), and it is cosponsored by Preservation Oklahoma, Inc. and the State Historic Preservation Office. NAPC faculty will discuss how local historic preservation ordinances work and their benefits to local preservation initiatives. Specific topics to be addressed include legal issues (authority to enforce local preservation zoning, property rights issues, economic hardship concerns, etc.); design review standards; commission procedures and ethics; identifying and designating local districts and landmarks; and generating public support for historic preservation. The faculty includes Wade Broadhead, Land Use and Preservation Planner, City of Pueblo, Pueblo, Colorado; Roxanne Eflin, Owner/Principal, Preservation Planning Associates, Buxton, Maine; Rory Hays, Attorney at Law, Phoenix, Arizona; and John Williams, Founding Principal, John Williams I Architect, Snohomish, Washington. CAMP will be presented on June 4 and 5, and there is a $25.00 fee for attendance in addition to the basic conference registration fee.

Preservation planner Elizabeth Watson, Principal, Heritage Strategies LLC and co-author of the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s Saving America’s Countryside: A Guide to Rural Conservation (Johns Hopkins University Press) will offer ideas for broadening any community’s historic preservation agenda in a two-part workshop on Friday morning, June 6. Encouraging Historic Preservation through Heritage Tourism (Session 1) and Encouraging Historic Preservation through Presenting your Community’s Stories (Session 2) are designed as either stand-alone or companion sessions. Heritage tourism is the tourism business generated by those who are traveling for pleasure to visit a historic site, museum, or historic community. Heritage tourists stay longer and spend more money than other tourists, and they expect a quality visitor experience. The heritage area concept provides a framework for sharing the history and culture of a geographic region. These sessions introduce the heritage area approach, highlight case studies, and provide an opportunity for participants to consider how Oklahoma communities can benefit from similar initiatives.

The conference will conclude with Friday afternoon’s Plenary Session. The Oklahoma Main Street Center sponsors the featured speaker, Linda Caldwell, who will present Preservation: A Bridge to Saving America’s Rural Places. Caldwell is the founder and former Executive Director for the Tennessee Overhill Heritage Association (TOHA), a program that began in 1990 as a pilot project for the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s “Heritage Tourism Initiative.” TOHA is a national model for successful cultural tourism. Its mission is to promote and preserve the natural and cultural resources of McMinn, Monroe, and Polk counties through cultural tourism. Caldwell has over thirty years experience working in the nonprofit sector on cultural tourism, community arts, rural economic development, and preservation.

Many other sessions and events are on the agenda, including a special program at the headquarters of the Oklahoma Archeological Survey; Preservation Oklahoma, Inc.’s annual meeting and luncheon with featured speaker Joe Watkins, Supervisory Anthropologist and Chief, Tribal Relations and American Cultures, National Park Service, Washington, D. C.; the State Historic Preservation Office’s awards banquet; the opening reception on Norman’s Main Street; and tours of local landmarks.

The conference provides a special opportunity for design professionals. Conference sessions qualify for HSW hours needed to fulfill requirements of the State of Oklahoma’s Board of Governors of Licensed Architects, Landscape Architects, and Interior Designers.

Joining the Oklahoma Historical Society, State Historic Preservation Office as conference cosponsors are the Oklahoma Main Street Center, Oklahoma Department of Commerce; Preservation Oklahoma, Inc.; University of Oklahoma, College of Architecture and Institute for Quality Communities; City of Norman; Cleveland County Historical Society; Norman Arts Council; Norman Chamber of Commerce; Norman Convention and Visitors Bureau; Norman Downtowners; and Oklahoma Archeological Survey.

To request a registration brochure, contact Melvena Heisch, Deputy SHPO at 405/522-4484 or mheisch@okhistory.org. The registration fee is $40.00 per person if you register by May 28, and there are optional ticketed events. The fee is $50.00 per person after the deadline or at the door. Information about the conference is also available at http://www.okhistory.org/shpo/conferencedetails.htm.

CONFERENCE PROGRAM FEATURES: COMMISSION ASSISTANCE MENTORING PROGRAM (CAMP)

Preservation Oklahoma, Inc. and the Oklahoma Historical Society, State Historic Preservation Office are pleased to cosponsor a special feature at the 2014 statewide preservation conference in Norman. Commission Assistance Mentoring Program (CAMP), an intensive one-and-a-half-day training opportunity for design review commission members, local government staff, and others, will be offered as a conference track on Wednesday afternoon (June 4) and all day Thursday (June 5).

CAMP is the well-known program of the National Alliance of Preservation Commissions (NAPC). Four of their faculty members will provide presentations designed to increase the understanding of how local historic preservation ordinances work and their benefits to local preservation initiatives. Specific topics to be addressed include legal issues (authority to enforce local preservation zoning, property rights issues, economic hardship concerns, etc.); design review standards (including hands-on design review exercise); commission procedures and ethics; identifying and designating local districts and landmarks; and generating public support for historic preservation. Each workshop participant will receive a notebook containing the extensive course materials.

NAPC is the national nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting local historic preservation commissions and the historic resources they help protect. The NAPC office is located in Athens, Georgia. Their faculty includes some of the nation’s leading preservation professionals in the fields of architecture, planning, and law. CAMP faculty participating at our conference include:

Wade Broadhead
Land Use and Preservation Planner
City of Pueblo
Pueblo, Colorado
Wade Broadhead is a Current Land Use and Preservation Planner for Pueblo, Colorado, a position he has held for seven years. Prior to his current position Wade obtained his degree from Western State College in Gunnison, Colorado and worked in Cultural Resource Management and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Wade’s interests lie in neighborhood/zoning/planning interface with preservation as well as preservation issues in low income, Right Sizing cities, and neighborhood Modernism, and he has presented at numerous National Trust and regional conferences. Mr. Broadhead spearheaded a seven year Neighborhood Heritage Enhancement program to document all of Pueblo’s older neighborhoods with exquisitely written contexts. That effort won the City and its partners the Colorado Governor’s Award for Historic Preservation in 2013. Wade also serves on the Executive Board of the NAPC.

Roxanne Eflin
Owner/Principal
Preservation Planning Associates
Buxton, Maine
Roxanne Eflin is Owner/Principal of Preservation Planning Associates. She holds a Bachelors in Public Administration, a Masters in Urban Planning and Historic Preservation and a Certificate in International Tour Management focusing on cultural/heritage resources. She has 30 years experience in historic preservation, downtown revitalization, place- based community development, cultural tourism and nonprofit leadership. Roxanne began her work in historic preservation in Colorado where she was the Main Street Manager in Manitou Springs, one of the original 30 National Main Street Center demonstration cities. She then served as the first Historic Preservation Officer for both Aspen and Pitkin County, and for Central City, a National Historic Landmark district. She relocated to Maine in 1997 to initiate the full-time Executive Director position of Maine Preservation, the statewide nonprofit organization. Under her leadership Maine Preservation grew into a full-service organization with advocacy efforts that helped lead in the passage of Maine’s historic preservation tax credit program and helped bring Main Street to Maine. She is in the process of returning home to Colorado.

Autumn Rierson Michael
Michael Preservation Group, Inc.
617 N. Main St.
Davidson, North Carolina
Autumn Rierson Michael of Michael Preservation Group, Inc., is a lawyer, professor, and preservation consultant based in Davidson, North Carolina. She currently works with communities around the region as a historic preservation consultant, particularly with respect to legal issues related to preservation commissions, local ordinances, and design guidelines, as well as federal and state income tax credits for historic preservation. Ms. Michael has taught preservation planning and law at UNC-Greensboro for nine years and has previously served as an adjunct at UNC Chapel Hill and University of Pennsylvania. Previously, Ms. Michael worked in the non-profit arena as an attorney with the National Trust for Historic Preservation, where she developed particular expertise in the area of preservation easements, Constitutional issues such as the regulation of historic religious properties and the Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act (“RLUIPA”), as well as NEPA and NHPA Section 106 reviews for federally involved projects. She has also served as Director of the Southwest Regional Office and General Counsel for the statewide Preservation North Carolina, and as Executive Director of the local nonprofit Historic Charlotte.

John Williams
Founding Principal
John Williams I Architect
Snohomish, Washington
John Williams is the founding principal of John Williams I Architect. His current responsibilities include project management, coordination, and design for both public and private clients. He works collaboratively on project teams rehabilitating historically significant resources, producing planning studies, and conducting preservation workshops. President Bush appointed Mr. Williams to the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation. John was appointed by Governor Locke to the Washington State Advisory Council on Historic Preservation and reappointed by Governor Gregoire as its Chairman. He has served as Vice President of Preservation Action and enjoyed serving as Chairman of the National Alliance of Preservation Commissions. He was the Chair of the Pike Place Market Historical Commission, Chair of the Oysterville Design Review Board, and a past member of the King County Landmarks Commission.

While many Oklahoma communities have historic preservation ordinances in place, some of them are not adequately or appropriately enforced. CAMP is a unique opportunity for those communities struggling to enforce their local ordinance and for those who are working to strengthen their already effective programs. For further information, contact David Pettyjohn at 405/525-5325 or david@preservationok.org; or Melvena Heisch at 405/522-4484 or mheisch@okhistory.org

2014 Statewide Preservation Conference Highlights

Full program and registration details for Historic Preservation ABCs: Oklahoma’s 26th Annual Statewide Preservation Conference will be available in late April. The conference will be held June 4-6 in Norman on the University of Oklahoma campus. Over forty speakers from Oklahoma and across the country will participate through lectures, roundtables, tours, and special workshops. Three of these special events and speakers are featured below.

Commission Assistance Mentoring Program (CAMP): Preservation Oklahoma, Inc. and the State Historic Preservation Office are cosponsors of Commission Assistance Mentoring Program (CAMP), a special feature of this year’s conference. The intensive one-and-a-half-day training opportunity for design review commission members, local government staff, and others is a program of the National Alliance of Preservation Commissions (NAPC). NAPC faculty will provide presentations designed to increase the understanding of how local historic preservation ordinances work and their benefits to local preservation initiatives. Specific topics to be addressed include legal issues (authority to enforce local preservation zoning, property rights issues, economic hardship concerns, etc.); design review standards; commission procedures and ethics; identifying and designating local districts and landmarks; and generating public support for historic preservation. Each workshop participant will receive a notebook containing the extensive course materials. NAPC is the national nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting local historic preservation commissions and the historic resources they help protect. Their faculty includes some of the nation’s leading preservation professionals in the fields of architecture, planning, and law. CAMP begins on Wednesday afternoon, June 4 and concludes at 5:00pm on Thursday, June 5.

Historic Preservation and Heritage Tourism Workshop:
drawing on her extensive experience of planning for heritage areas, preservation planner Elizabeth Watson will offer ideas for broadening any community’s historic preservation agenda in a two-part workshop on Friday morning, June 6. Encouraging Historic Preservation through Heritage Tourism (Session 1) and Encouraging Historic Preservation through Presenting your Community’s Stories (Session 2) are designed as either stand-alone or companion sessions. Heritage tourism is the tourism business generated by those who are traveling for pleasure to visit a historic site, museum, or historic community. Heritage tourists stay longer and spend more money than other tourists, and they expect a quality visitor experience. the heritage area concept provides a framework for sharing the history and culture of a geographic region. These sessions introduce the heritage area approach, highlight case studies, and provide an opportunity for participants to consider how Oklahoma communities can benefit from similar initiatives.

A. Elizabeth Watson, AICP, Principal, Heritage Strategies, LLC will present this half-day workshop on Friday morning, June 6. Elizabeth Watson has served nonprofit and governmental clients as a consultant and facilitator for more than twenty years. She most enjoys working with others on her passion, preserving environmentally and historically significant places, historic sites, and traditional communities through strategic planning and innovative programs. She has worked on many heritage areas, scenic byways, greenways, and other projects that combine regional planning with community education and resource conservation initiatives. A former nonprofit executive and state official as well as independent planner, she understands the complexities of cross-jurisdictional collaboration, public-private partnership, and multi-level governmental cooperation. She frequently advises nonprofit organizations on enhancing their capabilities to participate in such alliances through strategic planning, board development, fundraising, and civic engagement.

Elizabeth has worked in more than a dozen American national heritage areas to encourage stewardship and greater public access for natural, cultural, scenic, recreational, and historic resources. She is a co-author of the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s Saving America’s Countryside: A Guide to Rural Conservation (Johns Hopkins University Press, 1997, 2nd ed.). This book, which in 1990 won both the Historic Preservation Book Prize and an Honor Award from the American Society of Landscape Architects, grew out of her experience working for the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s Rural Program. She also co-produced the 1992 award-winning environmental film made for the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, Chesapeake: Living off the Land. Elizabeth holds a B.A. degree in history from Wake Forest University and a master’s degree in regional planning from the Pennsylvania State University.

Plenary Session: The conference will conclude with the Plenary Session on Friday afternoon, June 6. The Oklahoma Main Street Center sponsors the featured speaker, Linda Caldwell, who will present Preservation: A Bridge to Saving America’s Rural Places.

Linda Caldwell is the founder and former Executive Director for the Tennessee Overhill Heritage Association (TOHA), a program that began in 1990 as a pilot project for the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s “Heritage Tourism Initiative.” Today, TOHA is a national model for successful cultural tourism. Its mission is to promote and preserve the natural and cultural resources of McMinn, Monroe, and Polk counties through cultural tourism.

Linda has over thirty years experience working in the non-profit sector on cultural tourism, community arts, rural economic development, and preservation. Prior to her work with TOHA, she served for eleven years as Director for the Etowah Arts Commission. In 2001 TOHA formed the Old Line Railroad Coalition to successfully save an 1890 railroad from abandonment. The railroad is now owned by TOHA and Linda serves as the administrator. Most recently Linda managed a project to document the emigration route taken through the Tennessee Overhill by Cherokee citizens who were rounded up in western North Carolina and moved to Fort Cass in Tennessee before immigrating to Oklahoma.

Questions? Contact Melvena Heisch, Deputy SHPO, at 405/522-4484 or mheisch@okhistory.org. Also, see the conference blog at http://okpreservationconference.wordpress.com, and the SHPO’s website at http://www.okhistory.org/shpo/conference.htm.

AIA/CES CREDITS & STUDENT SCHOLARSHIPS FOR 2014 STATEWIDE PRESERVATION CONFERENCE

The Oklahoma Historical Society, State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) is pleased to announce special opportunities for design professionals and for Oklahoma college and university students planning to atten Historic Preservation ABCs: Oklahoma’s 26th Annual Statewide Preservation Conference. It will be held June 4-6, 2014, in Norman on the University of Oklahoma campus (full registration and program details available in late April).

Design professionals who attend the conference will qualify for HSW hours needed to fulfill requirements of the State of Oklahoma’s Board of Governors of Licensed Architects, Landscape Architects, and Interior Designers. Simply register for the conference and sign in at the SHPO’s table in the registration area. There are no additional fees for this service. A certificate of attendance will be mailed to participants after the conference. Self report your attendance to the board. If you have questions, contact Melvena Heisch as indicated below.

Oklahoma college and university students are eligible for scholarships to attend the conference. We encourage students pursuing degrees in history, architecture, archeology, and other historic preservation-related fields to attend the conference to learn about career opportunities as well as historic preservation issues and techniques. We are offering twenty (20) scholarships on a first-come basis to those who qualify. The scholarship covers the conference registration fee, and the application deadline is 5:00pm, Friday, May 9. For details and an application form contact Melvena Heisch, Deputy SHPO, at 405/522-4484 or mheisch@okhistory.org, or visit the SHPO’s website at http://www.okhistory.org/shpo/conference.htm.

2014 STATEWIDE PRESERVATION CONFERENCE IN NORMAN

Save the dates, June 4-6, 2014, for Historic Preservation ABCs: Oklahoma’s 26th Annual Statewide Preservation Conference. Start packing your book-bags and plan to enroll for historic preservation summer school in Norman on the University of Oklahoma campus.

The three courses of study include:

TRACK A: Academic Pursuits, which focuses on Norman’s and the state’s architectural legacy; research collections and tools for historic preservation; and a half-day visit to the Oklahoma Archeological Survey to tour the archeological laboratories and learn about current field work, research projects, and cooperative efforts with the SHPO and the Oklahoma Department of Transportation, Cultural Resource Program.

TRACK B: Back to Basics, which includes an introduction to the National Register of Historic Places and the Secretary of the Interior’s Rehabilitation Standards; rehabilitation project case studies of all sizes; and highlights of how the arts and historic preservation combine to promote community revitalization.

TRACK C: Comprehensive Community Preservation, which features two workshops. First is the National Alliance of Preservation Commission’s one-and-a-half-day Community Assistance Mentoring Program (CAMP) for design review commissions and local government staff. Second is a half-day workshop about heritage areas and corridors and how they support economic development and heritage tourism, presented by Elizabeth Watson, Heritage Strategies LLC.

Special events include the opening reception on Main Street in historic downtown Norman; local tours; Preservation Oklahoma, Inc.’s annual meeting and luncheon; the State Historic Preservation Office’s annual awards banquet; and the Plenary Session, featuring Linda Caldwell, Executive Director, Tennessee Overhill Heritage Association, who will deliver a lively discussion about how small towns can realize economic benefits and strengthen rural heritage tourism programs through spin-off from nearby, larger cities.

Conference cosponsors include State Historic Preservation Office, Oklahoma Historical Society; Oklahoma Main Street Center, Oklahoma Department of Commerce; Preservation Oklahoma, Inc.; University of Oklahoma, College of Architecture, Institute for Quality Communities; Campus Corner Merchants Association; City of Norman; Cleveland County Historical Society; Norman Arts Council; Norman Chamber of Commerce; Norman Convention and Visitors Bureau; Norman Downtowners; and Oklahoma Archeological Survey.

Full conference program and registration information will be available in late April. Follow conference developments at

http://www.okhistory.org/shpo/conference.htm;

http://www.facebook.com/okshpo; http://www.twitter.com/okshpo;
and http://www.okpreservationconference.wordpress.com.

If you may have questions, contact Melvena Heisch, Deputy SHPO (405/522-4484 or mheisch@okhistory.org) or Umit Hope Mander, Associate Director, Institute for Quality Communities, College of Architecture, University of Oklahoma (405/325-2434 or umander@ou.edu).