CONFERENCE PROGRAM FEATURES: COMMISSION ASSISTANCE MENTORING PROGRAM (CAMP)

Preservation Oklahoma, Inc. and the Oklahoma Historical Society, State Historic Preservation Office are pleased to cosponsor a special feature at the 2014 statewide preservation conference in Norman. Commission Assistance Mentoring Program (CAMP), an intensive one-and-a-half-day training opportunity for design review commission members, local government staff, and others, will be offered as a conference track on Wednesday afternoon (June 4) and all day Thursday (June 5).

CAMP is the well-known program of the National Alliance of Preservation Commissions (NAPC). Four of their faculty members will provide presentations designed to increase the understanding of how local historic preservation ordinances work and their benefits to local preservation initiatives. Specific topics to be addressed include legal issues (authority to enforce local preservation zoning, property rights issues, economic hardship concerns, etc.); design review standards (including hands-on design review exercise); commission procedures and ethics; identifying and designating local districts and landmarks; and generating public support for historic preservation. Each workshop participant will receive a notebook containing the extensive course materials.

NAPC is the national nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting local historic preservation commissions and the historic resources they help protect. The NAPC office is located in Athens, Georgia. Their faculty includes some of the nation’s leading preservation professionals in the fields of architecture, planning, and law. CAMP faculty participating at our conference include:

Wade Broadhead
Land Use and Preservation Planner
City of Pueblo
Pueblo, Colorado
Wade Broadhead is a Current Land Use and Preservation Planner for Pueblo, Colorado, a position he has held for seven years. Prior to his current position Wade obtained his degree from Western State College in Gunnison, Colorado and worked in Cultural Resource Management and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Wade’s interests lie in neighborhood/zoning/planning interface with preservation as well as preservation issues in low income, Right Sizing cities, and neighborhood Modernism, and he has presented at numerous National Trust and regional conferences. Mr. Broadhead spearheaded a seven year Neighborhood Heritage Enhancement program to document all of Pueblo’s older neighborhoods with exquisitely written contexts. That effort won the City and its partners the Colorado Governor’s Award for Historic Preservation in 2013. Wade also serves on the Executive Board of the NAPC.

Roxanne Eflin
Owner/Principal
Preservation Planning Associates
Buxton, Maine
Roxanne Eflin is Owner/Principal of Preservation Planning Associates. She holds a Bachelors in Public Administration, a Masters in Urban Planning and Historic Preservation and a Certificate in International Tour Management focusing on cultural/heritage resources. She has 30 years experience in historic preservation, downtown revitalization, place- based community development, cultural tourism and nonprofit leadership. Roxanne began her work in historic preservation in Colorado where she was the Main Street Manager in Manitou Springs, one of the original 30 National Main Street Center demonstration cities. She then served as the first Historic Preservation Officer for both Aspen and Pitkin County, and for Central City, a National Historic Landmark district. She relocated to Maine in 1997 to initiate the full-time Executive Director position of Maine Preservation, the statewide nonprofit organization. Under her leadership Maine Preservation grew into a full-service organization with advocacy efforts that helped lead in the passage of Maine’s historic preservation tax credit program and helped bring Main Street to Maine. She is in the process of returning home to Colorado.

Autumn Rierson Michael
Michael Preservation Group, Inc.
617 N. Main St.
Davidson, North Carolina
Autumn Rierson Michael of Michael Preservation Group, Inc., is a lawyer, professor, and preservation consultant based in Davidson, North Carolina. She currently works with communities around the region as a historic preservation consultant, particularly with respect to legal issues related to preservation commissions, local ordinances, and design guidelines, as well as federal and state income tax credits for historic preservation. Ms. Michael has taught preservation planning and law at UNC-Greensboro for nine years and has previously served as an adjunct at UNC Chapel Hill and University of Pennsylvania. Previously, Ms. Michael worked in the non-profit arena as an attorney with the National Trust for Historic Preservation, where she developed particular expertise in the area of preservation easements, Constitutional issues such as the regulation of historic religious properties and the Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act (“RLUIPA”), as well as NEPA and NHPA Section 106 reviews for federally involved projects. She has also served as Director of the Southwest Regional Office and General Counsel for the statewide Preservation North Carolina, and as Executive Director of the local nonprofit Historic Charlotte.

John Williams
Founding Principal
John Williams I Architect
Snohomish, Washington
John Williams is the founding principal of John Williams I Architect. His current responsibilities include project management, coordination, and design for both public and private clients. He works collaboratively on project teams rehabilitating historically significant resources, producing planning studies, and conducting preservation workshops. President Bush appointed Mr. Williams to the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation. John was appointed by Governor Locke to the Washington State Advisory Council on Historic Preservation and reappointed by Governor Gregoire as its Chairman. He has served as Vice President of Preservation Action and enjoyed serving as Chairman of the National Alliance of Preservation Commissions. He was the Chair of the Pike Place Market Historical Commission, Chair of the Oysterville Design Review Board, and a past member of the King County Landmarks Commission.

While many Oklahoma communities have historic preservation ordinances in place, some of them are not adequately or appropriately enforced. CAMP is a unique opportunity for those communities struggling to enforce their local ordinance and for those who are working to strengthen their already effective programs. For further information, contact David Pettyjohn at 405/525-5325 or david@preservationok.org; or Melvena Heisch at 405/522-4484 or mheisch@okhistory.org

2014 Statewide Preservation Conference Highlights

Full program and registration details for Historic Preservation ABCs: Oklahoma’s 26th Annual Statewide Preservation Conference will be available in late April. The conference will be held June 4-6 in Norman on the University of Oklahoma campus. Over forty speakers from Oklahoma and across the country will participate through lectures, roundtables, tours, and special workshops. Three of these special events and speakers are featured below.

Commission Assistance Mentoring Program (CAMP): Preservation Oklahoma, Inc. and the State Historic Preservation Office are cosponsors of Commission Assistance Mentoring Program (CAMP), a special feature of this year’s conference. The intensive one-and-a-half-day training opportunity for design review commission members, local government staff, and others is a program of the National Alliance of Preservation Commissions (NAPC). NAPC faculty will provide presentations designed to increase the understanding of how local historic preservation ordinances work and their benefits to local preservation initiatives. Specific topics to be addressed include legal issues (authority to enforce local preservation zoning, property rights issues, economic hardship concerns, etc.); design review standards; commission procedures and ethics; identifying and designating local districts and landmarks; and generating public support for historic preservation. Each workshop participant will receive a notebook containing the extensive course materials. NAPC is the national nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting local historic preservation commissions and the historic resources they help protect. Their faculty includes some of the nation’s leading preservation professionals in the fields of architecture, planning, and law. CAMP begins on Wednesday afternoon, June 4 and concludes at 5:00pm on Thursday, June 5.

Historic Preservation and Heritage Tourism Workshop:
drawing on her extensive experience of planning for heritage areas, preservation planner Elizabeth Watson will offer ideas for broadening any community’s historic preservation agenda in a two-part workshop on Friday morning, June 6. Encouraging Historic Preservation through Heritage Tourism (Session 1) and Encouraging Historic Preservation through Presenting your Community’s Stories (Session 2) are designed as either stand-alone or companion sessions. Heritage tourism is the tourism business generated by those who are traveling for pleasure to visit a historic site, museum, or historic community. Heritage tourists stay longer and spend more money than other tourists, and they expect a quality visitor experience. the heritage area concept provides a framework for sharing the history and culture of a geographic region. These sessions introduce the heritage area approach, highlight case studies, and provide an opportunity for participants to consider how Oklahoma communities can benefit from similar initiatives.

A. Elizabeth Watson, AICP, Principal, Heritage Strategies, LLC will present this half-day workshop on Friday morning, June 6. Elizabeth Watson has served nonprofit and governmental clients as a consultant and facilitator for more than twenty years. She most enjoys working with others on her passion, preserving environmentally and historically significant places, historic sites, and traditional communities through strategic planning and innovative programs. She has worked on many heritage areas, scenic byways, greenways, and other projects that combine regional planning with community education and resource conservation initiatives. A former nonprofit executive and state official as well as independent planner, she understands the complexities of cross-jurisdictional collaboration, public-private partnership, and multi-level governmental cooperation. She frequently advises nonprofit organizations on enhancing their capabilities to participate in such alliances through strategic planning, board development, fundraising, and civic engagement.

Elizabeth has worked in more than a dozen American national heritage areas to encourage stewardship and greater public access for natural, cultural, scenic, recreational, and historic resources. She is a co-author of the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s Saving America’s Countryside: A Guide to Rural Conservation (Johns Hopkins University Press, 1997, 2nd ed.). This book, which in 1990 won both the Historic Preservation Book Prize and an Honor Award from the American Society of Landscape Architects, grew out of her experience working for the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s Rural Program. She also co-produced the 1992 award-winning environmental film made for the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, Chesapeake: Living off the Land. Elizabeth holds a B.A. degree in history from Wake Forest University and a master’s degree in regional planning from the Pennsylvania State University.

Plenary Session: The conference will conclude with the Plenary Session on Friday afternoon, June 6. The Oklahoma Main Street Center sponsors the featured speaker, Linda Caldwell, who will present Preservation: A Bridge to Saving America’s Rural Places.

Linda Caldwell is the founder and former Executive Director for the Tennessee Overhill Heritage Association (TOHA), a program that began in 1990 as a pilot project for the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s “Heritage Tourism Initiative.” Today, TOHA is a national model for successful cultural tourism. Its mission is to promote and preserve the natural and cultural resources of McMinn, Monroe, and Polk counties through cultural tourism.

Linda has over thirty years experience working in the non-profit sector on cultural tourism, community arts, rural economic development, and preservation. Prior to her work with TOHA, she served for eleven years as Director for the Etowah Arts Commission. In 2001 TOHA formed the Old Line Railroad Coalition to successfully save an 1890 railroad from abandonment. The railroad is now owned by TOHA and Linda serves as the administrator. Most recently Linda managed a project to document the emigration route taken through the Tennessee Overhill by Cherokee citizens who were rounded up in western North Carolina and moved to Fort Cass in Tennessee before immigrating to Oklahoma.

Questions? Contact Melvena Heisch, Deputy SHPO, at 405/522-4484 or mheisch@okhistory.org. Also, see the conference blog at http://okpreservationconference.wordpress.com, and the SHPO’s website at http://www.okhistory.org/shpo/conference.htm.

AIA/CES CREDITS & STUDENT SCHOLARSHIPS FOR 2014 STATEWIDE PRESERVATION CONFERENCE

The Oklahoma Historical Society, State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) is pleased to announce special opportunities for design professionals and for Oklahoma college and university students planning to atten Historic Preservation ABCs: Oklahoma’s 26th Annual Statewide Preservation Conference. It will be held June 4-6, 2014, in Norman on the University of Oklahoma campus (full registration and program details available in late April).

Design professionals who attend the conference will qualify for HSW hours needed to fulfill requirements of the State of Oklahoma’s Board of Governors of Licensed Architects, Landscape Architects, and Interior Designers. Simply register for the conference and sign in at the SHPO’s table in the registration area. There are no additional fees for this service. A certificate of attendance will be mailed to participants after the conference. Self report your attendance to the board. If you have questions, contact Melvena Heisch as indicated below.

Oklahoma college and university students are eligible for scholarships to attend the conference. We encourage students pursuing degrees in history, architecture, archeology, and other historic preservation-related fields to attend the conference to learn about career opportunities as well as historic preservation issues and techniques. We are offering twenty (20) scholarships on a first-come basis to those who qualify. The scholarship covers the conference registration fee, and the application deadline is 5:00pm, Friday, May 9. For details and an application form contact Melvena Heisch, Deputy SHPO, at 405/522-4484 or mheisch@okhistory.org, or visit the SHPO’s website at http://www.okhistory.org/shpo/conference.htm.

2014 STATEWIDE PRESERVATION CONFERENCE IN NORMAN

Save the dates, June 4-6, 2014, for Historic Preservation ABCs: Oklahoma’s 26th Annual Statewide Preservation Conference. Start packing your book-bags and plan to enroll for historic preservation summer school in Norman on the University of Oklahoma campus.

The three courses of study include:

TRACK A: Academic Pursuits, which focuses on Norman’s and the state’s architectural legacy; research collections and tools for historic preservation; and a half-day visit to the Oklahoma Archeological Survey to tour the archeological laboratories and learn about current field work, research projects, and cooperative efforts with the SHPO and the Oklahoma Department of Transportation, Cultural Resource Program.

TRACK B: Back to Basics, which includes an introduction to the National Register of Historic Places and the Secretary of the Interior’s Rehabilitation Standards; rehabilitation project case studies of all sizes; and highlights of how the arts and historic preservation combine to promote community revitalization.

TRACK C: Comprehensive Community Preservation, which features two workshops. First is the National Alliance of Preservation Commission’s one-and-a-half-day Community Assistance Mentoring Program (CAMP) for design review commissions and local government staff. Second is a half-day workshop about heritage areas and corridors and how they support economic development and heritage tourism, presented by Elizabeth Watson, Heritage Strategies LLC.

Special events include the opening reception on Main Street in historic downtown Norman; local tours; Preservation Oklahoma, Inc.’s annual meeting and luncheon; the State Historic Preservation Office’s annual awards banquet; and the Plenary Session, featuring Linda Caldwell, Executive Director, Tennessee Overhill Heritage Association, who will deliver a lively discussion about how small towns can realize economic benefits and strengthen rural heritage tourism programs through spin-off from nearby, larger cities.

Conference cosponsors include State Historic Preservation Office, Oklahoma Historical Society; Oklahoma Main Street Center, Oklahoma Department of Commerce; Preservation Oklahoma, Inc.; University of Oklahoma, College of Architecture, Institute for Quality Communities; Campus Corner Merchants Association; City of Norman; Cleveland County Historical Society; Norman Arts Council; Norman Chamber of Commerce; Norman Convention and Visitors Bureau; Norman Downtowners; and Oklahoma Archeological Survey.

Full conference program and registration information will be available in late April. Follow conference developments at

http://www.okhistory.org/shpo/conference.htm;

http://www.facebook.com/okshpo; http://www.twitter.com/okshpo;
and http://www.okpreservationconference.wordpress.com.

If you may have questions, contact Melvena Heisch, Deputy SHPO (405/522-4484 or mheisch@okhistory.org) or Umit Hope Mander, Associate Director, Institute for Quality Communities, College of Architecture, University of Oklahoma (405/325-2434 or umander@ou.edu).